Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: For those more knowledgeable in electricity than me...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,353

    For those more knowledgeable in electricity than me...

    I have a Jet 1442 with the Reeves speed control system that has/is giving me trouble... I've pulled the spindle and replaced it, replaced the moving pulleys on the spindle, replaced all the bearings, replaced the harp that slides along the spindle and reset the worm drive that slides the harp along the spindle to change the speed... some how, I didn't get the worm gear set in the right position as my speed indicator is off by two notches... I can live with that, but a I'm getting a lot of noise that sounds like bearings rattling and having difficulty with the harp sliding off the bearing... I've put locktite on it and that helps, but it's getting annoying...

    my thoughts are that if I have a couple of good Saturdays this summer, I may replace the 1442 Reeves set up with a slightly bigger lathe with EVS. I know Jet has the 1642 that's 110/115 electrical with a 1.5 hp motor... their 2 hp is 220V. And looking at the Grizzly line of EVS lathes, they all appear to be 220V.... I like the fact that the Grizzly units are less expensive than the JET, but I do like the JET... my friend has one that I've used and I am impressed with it...

    I have a 5 breaker panel in my shop, 20 am breakers in all of them. All of them are in use. 1 breaker for the lights, one for the DC in the outside shed, and the other 3 for the four walls where I have a plug every other stud.... they're divided so that I don't have heavy machinery all plugged into the same circuit... the back wall is one circuit, the end walls and one plug on the front are on separate circuits.

    What would I need to do to create a 220V circuit in my shop? Would I have to run new line for the 220 or can the breaker box be adapted? My electrical line is underground from the house to the shop, buried in gray conduit about 18" deep.

    I will have to have an electrician do the actual work... I have a healthy respect for electricity and not all that much knowledge.
    Last edited by Chuck Ellis; 04-13-2016 at 03:21 PM.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    You will need a larger breaker box to accommodate a 220V breaker. Or you will need to combine some circuits. Or you may be able to get piggybacked breakers to create space in the box. All this depends on the feed wire to the box. The 220V Jet requires a 20 amp 220V breaker which requires two slots in your box. Talk to your sparky.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,021
    You don't mention if you have 220 in the box or not.

    If you do - it might be possible to install a couple of smaller breakers to make room for the 220 breaker.

    If you do not have 220 in the box you will need a 220 feed installed.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    A few questions.

    What size and type of breaker you have feeding the shop?

    Can you see what size of wire is feeding the shop?

    Can you get the part number for the panel in the shop?

    How much are the three outlets around the edge of the shop used (and for what?).

    How many lights and of what type(s) do you have on the lighting circuit?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,452
    Yup, all those questions I was going to ask, let us know and we can go from there.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Parker County, Texas
    Posts
    1,502
    Depending on the amperage of the breaker feeding the box in your shop, and of course the gauge of the wire as well as the distance it is going has a lot to do with it all. You can always put a heavier breaker set in the main box as long as the wire is 10-8 gauge. 8 is preferable. For safety reasons on feed lines I always go one beyond code requirements. Then put a larger box in your shop and you can create a 220 circuit, which is simply 2 110's combined. The size of the wire feeding into your shop dictates the resistance therefore how much amperage you are actually getting. An electrician will be able to take care of all of that for you. Should actually be a rather low cost job. If you were right around here I'd do it for you in about an hour or so including hooking all your previous wires to the new box and tell you to have good fun with a labor expense of a nice brisket dinner. I have always done all of my own wiring. One of those things I learned as a teenage as well as some plumbing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Not much to add but can you provide a picture of the box with the breakers with the cover off that may allow some of us to better understand what you already have so we can offer better advice.
    The fact that you say you have a 5 breaker panel indicate to me that you may have some spare room in the box since most panels have an even number of breakers.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,353
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    A few questions.

    What size and type of breaker you have feeding the shop?Where would I find this info...in the main breaker box off the house circuit?? We have a breaker box on a pole behind the house and the line feeds off that... I'll take a look tomorrow when I'm back outside.

    Can you see what size of wire is feeding the shop?Again, I'll look in the big breaker box and see if I can tell what size wire was used... I had the wire installed by an electrician, but he's not around any longer... think he went back to Rhode island... What gauge should I be looking at??

    Can you get the part number for the panel in the shop?I'll look at that tomorrow when I'm back in the shop... we've been out all afternoon and just got home and got into my lounge clothes for the evening... will get back tomorrow.

    How much are the three outlets around the edge of the shop used (and for what?).On the back wall of the shop which is all one circuit, I have my compressor, band saw, table saw, drill press, belt sander, my slow speed grinder, my little lathe and one of those Rockler upside down saber saws that are plugged into the plugs along this wall... none of these are run simultaneous, except the compressor (a small 6 or 10 gallon oil less) is on whenever I'm in the shop...the tools are used intermittently and never all or more than one at a time. --- On one end of the shop where I have work station, I have a microwave, a small tube light and a small desk fan that runs occasionally... the light is turned on as soon as I get into the shop... microwave is used on occasion to dry wood, not often... there is a spare plug here that I use when working at the bench ... I plug battery charger or a hand tool in for short uses. --- the other end of the shop has the big lathe, the light over the lathe, my high speed grinder, an electric sander that I use to power sand on the lathe and my shop vacuum.... the lathe, light and sander get used most simultaneously, but are usually turned off when I use the shop vac.

    How many lights and of what type(s) do you have on the lighting circuit?
    The lights are all fluorescents hanging from the ceiling.. currently there are 4, but need to add two more for better light... there used to be 5, but a flying bowl took out one and I haven't replaced it yet.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Outside the beltway
    Posts
    5,259
    I nooooo noffing.....
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    You should be able to see the breaker size on the breaker box on the pole, depending on what that is makes the wire size more or less interesting

    With the breaker box being on the pole you might have better luck seeing the gauge of the wire from the box in the shop. You may have to pull the front off of the box to see it, don't worry if you're not comfortable doing that, odds better than 50% are the breaker is as large as the wire supports so if we know that we're most of the way there.
    Last edited by Ryan Mooney; 04-14-2016 at 10:34 PM. Reason: fix lounge->wire no idea how I swiped that..

Similar Threads

  1. Electricity for shop
    By Mark Kosmowski in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-30-2013, 02:20 AM
  2. How much electricity did you use?
    By Jeff Horton in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-12-2011, 06:10 AM
  3. Electricity Suggestions for Shop
    By Cynthia White in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 01-13-2011, 09:26 PM
  4. static electricity and dust lines
    By allen levine in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-19-2010, 08:28 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •