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Thread: is there a slow glue?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    is there a slow glue?

    What do y'all do when glueing up projects that take some time where the first sections glued might set before getting to the last sections? I normally use Elmer's Probond but am not married to it. Willing to try other things. BTW, I do use CA, epoxy or poly for small projects.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    I believe Titebond makes a slower glue - 15 min open time. I've used it - worked well.
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    What do you mean by long open time? Titebone had a extended time as already stated, epoxy can have a long open time depending on portions.

  4. #4
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    The Titebond I used - can't remember exact name - allowed for gluing up many parts prior to assembly. It does not set up quickly like others, hence the long 'open' time. Hope I'm clear - I'm not have a lot of luck expressing myself today.

    Follow me------ http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...er=open%20time
    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 05-08-2007 at 05:13 PM.
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  5. #5
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    TB Extend does give you a bit more open time and takes a bit longer in the clamps. I had to keep shaking my bottle to keep it well mixed. I don't know if this is characteristic of the glue as I've only gone through one bottle.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, I'm going to town today. Will stop at the big box and read lables.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
    David Marks uses plastic resin glue for big glue up jobs. You might check his website for the brand.

  8. #8
    I use Original Titebond or Titebond II... I am as slow as they get. Never had one set up on me yet. Do these things before you start (I swear I'm gonna do it next time, promise ) Get your clamps ready and at hand, clean the old glue off and set the size near the size needed. Get your damp cloth ready , Glue brush and place to set it down between applications. Clean off the old gunk from the glue spout, Start with a near full applicator get your act together and practice a dry run befor you start. If you do these prep things you assembly will run smoother. (as I said, I promise to do this next time, or at least the time after.... )


  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
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    I recently used DAP Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue to glue up a large painted bookcase and really appreciated the longer open time compared to my usual TB original.

    Another brand of plastic resin glue that you may want to check out is Unibond 800, which I believe is commonly used in veneering.

    Another supposed benefit of plastic resin glue over PVA is the lack of glue creep. Again, thats just what I've read, I am new to PRG, but I like it so far.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Between St Joseph and Savannah, MO
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    I second the use of DAP's Plastic Resin Glue. It is a urea-formaldehyde one-part glue, meaning there is nothing to mix other than add water in the proportions recommended on the container.

    Follow the instructions to the letter. AND note that it makes a difference if you mix using weights for the glue powder and the water, or whether you use volumes.

    You will appreciate the urea-formaldehyde glues when you face a complicated glue-up, as with lots of dovetails, etc.


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    Al
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