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Thread: Hazard !

  1. #1
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    Hazard !

    twice now I have had my band saw blade jump and grab the chunk of wood, It's one of the fastest things I've seen happen in a long time.

    So whats the main cause ?

    Blade stretching out ?
    operator screwing up ? I've been very anneal about keeping a steady hand on the wood and tight to the bar and bed.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  2. #2
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    Can you describe a bit more what's happening here, I'm not quite sure what you mean by "jump" in this context? Sounds a bit nerve wracking!

    The two guesses I have based on things I've done wrong are:

    The blade is to coarse. If you don't have ~3 teeth in the wood at a time it can get a bit grabby and start pulling the wood around. The problem gets worse the thinner the wood you're cutting is.

    You don't have adequate support under the cutting point. I've had this happen when cutting uneven pieces and the piece will pull down and forward kind of slamming it into the table. The best solution is of course setting it up so the workpiece is always fully supported, failing that you can get away with it a bit easier with a finer blade (see above) and feeding slower.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  3. #3
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    Ryan when the blade jumped or caused the wood to jump grabbing the blade and in bedding it , twisting the blade. The only way to remove the blade is to chip the wood away.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  4. #4
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    I dunno sounds like its grabbing pretty hard though. The only times I've really had a bade get wedged badly was with really bad reaction wood and I did have some of that pinch down on the blade hard enough to slow things down. The trick there was the opposite of the above and a coarser blade with more set to make a wider kerf to clear the back of the blade. I've only had that happen with pretty good sized chunks though (like 8-10" thick).

    How thick of a piece were you cutting?

    Would be interesting to see a picture of one trapped in place if you have it happen again.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  5. #5
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    6-8" W , 10-12"L i need to get a new blade tomorrorw.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hawksford View Post
    6-8" W , 10-12"L i need to get a new blade tomorrorw.
    Are you trying to rip cut a round piece - like trying to rip a log section - and having it twist?

    Or are you trying to cross cut a log (or branch) section into slabs? and having it rotate?

    Neither type of cut should be attempted unless you have the workpiece stabilized on some sort of sled.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
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    Thanks Jim , yes and yes
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  8. #8
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    Ok, yeah so that's what I meant by "no support under the cut"... Definitely a good way to get in a wreck in a hurry. If there is air under the piece where the blade is exiting the work at any time and the piece isn't solidly locking into a jig or a sled, stop and figure out a better way to do it.

    You can see what happens in this video at about 1:00 in, he also has a somewhat reasonable sled setup. I'm not quite convinced that is cookie cutter version has adequate support for my liking but its better than nothing:

    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  9. #9
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    The wood isn't pinching the blade is it? Maybe tension isn't tight enough on the blade and it's slipping sightly?
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hawksford View Post
    Thanks Jim , yes and yes
    Don't do that. Problem solved.

    Seriously, you need to use a jig or some other secure method of holding the workpiece if you're cutting round stock. Otherwise, you'll eat up a lot of blades. (That's the voice of experience talking.)

    Here's how I did it:

    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...9-Bandsaw-Sled
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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