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Thread: What is Waterlox?

  1. #1
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    What is Waterlox?

    I have a large entertainment center build coming up, the client wants a very natural wood color, the top grade plywood I have is Shina looks like maple and will work well, but I don't have any possibility of spraying a finish. They want a matte finish, so I thought something like Waterlox would be good, I can brush it on and build up a good coat, but I can't get it for a reasonable amount here. They want $150 for quart of it, and it will take a couple of weeks to get.

    Waterlox on Amazon Japan



    My question then is what is Waterlox, is it just Tung oil or is it something else? I think I can get Tung oil here, but I'm not sure it will be like Waterlox.
    Any ideas?
    Thanks
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    ............................................

    My question then is what is Waterlox, is it just Tung oil or is it something else? I think I can get Tung oil here, but I'm not sure it will be like Waterlox.
    Any ideas?
    Thanks
    According to them {from here}
    "First and foremost, Waterlox tung oil-based varnishes have no competitors. No other finish manufacturer utilizes tung oil, resin and mineral spirits to produce a product that has the same characteristics as Waterlox"

    Sorry, that's all I can offer....



    The perception of perfection is perfectly clear to everyone else

  3. #3
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    I would not use that, if you are bent on waterlox here is the sealer

    Waterlox Original Sealer - $59.00 / Gallon - PaintSource.net‎
    Adwww.paintsource.net/‎
    Overpacked, and delivered to you in 1 to 4 days.
    Waterlox Tung Oil featured by PaintSource Network

    Waterlox is for an area that is high moister like maine. If you need that kind of paint ok but let the customer know the cost of the paint ,
    Last edited by Dave Hawksford; 08-09-2016 at 02:01 PM.
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  4. #4
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    The original is a phenolic based varnish with tung oil resins. Most varnish is alkyd or poly based, the phenolic is a bit harder than poly, and I believe somewhat more resistant the elements than alkyd. Pop woodworking discusses them more: http://www.popularwoodworking.com/ar...ces_of_varnish

    Waterlox is pretty tough, I used some on some brewery tasting trays as an experiment and it lasted fairly well through a few years of hot water washes and beer several times a day.

    A possible downside in your case is that it's fairly amber and tends to yellow a bit more with age than some of the alternatives. On a pale wood like that it would be fairly noticeable. I think it looks pretty good on cherry and woods like that but maple is a tougher decision.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  5. #5
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    Stu you could make up some Maloof finish, it is a soft non gloss finish and easy to make, use 1/3 pure tung oil, 1/3 blo and 1/3 wipe on poly, it is what he used on most pieces, it's easy to use and lasts a long time, he would put on several thin coats over a period of time.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Ryan nailed it, it is the phenolic/tung oil formula that makes it unique. He also mentioned the color, it's the darkest of the varnishes. Tung oil by itself isn't going to be a substitute.
    I long for the days when Coke was a cola and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard; 1939-2016)

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys.

    I found some local Tung Oil with the driers etc in it and I have a small sample bottle coming, I'll give it a try to see what it is like.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here is a screen capture of the translated page, it is NOT pure Tung Oil but something that has some additives in it. I'll see how it works.

    They don't want totally blonde, they want a bit of color, but not the Dark Walnut they were thinking originally.

    I hope this stuff does the trick, something like $115 for 4 liters (about a gallon US).

    It says brush on, wait 10 to 20 min, remove excess with a rag, wait 24 hours, then a light sanding and repeat, will not come to a gloss finish, but a satin, or semi-gloss.

    I'll report back when I get a chance to try it out.

    Thanks
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    I mainly spray, but had a requirement for an oiled finish a few months ago. I used Watco "Teak Oil Finish" that I had on hand from the big box. Applied a coat, wait a bit, and wipe it off, next day repeat, etc. The last coat I didn't wipe enough - it had an ugly gummy finish that steel wool wouldn't touch.
    Expecting to have to remove it all and start over, I got out the cabinet scraper, and the gummy part came off easily, leaving a nice oiled finish. Minor touch up, steel wool, and furniture wax and it was a finish I was proud of, and the customer liked.

    I know Teaks don't produce oil, so I suspect this is an oil/varnish mix - the varnish providing the solvents and dryers, and the oil probably being linseed oil. It is sold for hard dense woods, so probably has a higher percent solvent to help it soak in.

    This isn't a direct answer to your question, but I suspect the nature of the oil is less important than the way it is applied and allowed to soak in, wiped, and dried in layers.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Plesums View Post
    I mainly spray, but had a requirement for an oiled finish a few months ago. I used Watco "Teak Oil Finish" that I had on hand from the big box. Applied a coat, wait a bit, and wipe it off, next day repeat, etc. The last coat I didn't wipe enough - it had an ugly gummy finish that steel wool wouldn't touch.
    Expecting to have to remove it all and start over, I got out the cabinet scraper, and the gummy part came off easily, leaving a nice oiled finish. Minor touch up, steel wool, and furniture wax and it was a finish I was proud of, and the customer liked.

    I know Teaks don't produce oil, so I suspect this is an oil/varnish mix - the varnish providing the solvents and dryers, and the oil probably being linseed oil. It is sold for hard dense woods, so probably has a higher percent solvent to help it soak in.

    This isn't a direct answer to your question, but I suspect the nature of the oil is less important than the way it is applied and allowed to soak in, wiped, and dried in layers.

    It seems I can get Watco Teak Oil here in Japan, but I'm not sure it is for me on this project, according to Watco the Teak oil is formulated for very dense woods, like Teak and is meant to be applied often to keep the wood (thinking a deck chair or boat) well oiled.

    Thanks for sharing, I did not know they have such a product, they have the regular Watco oils here but I've never seen the teak oil in the stores, but they do have it.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    OK I got the sample, there were two companies that I found who had a product I was interested in, the first company has everything laid out, an online shopping page where you can easily make your order, and will ship ASAP. The second company has a form you have to fill out and submit before they will even tell you the price of the product, this was a full page form, asking things like "If you are a business, how much business do you do in a year?" How many people are employed at your company, how many square feet is your workshop etc. Once submitted and approved, they would send you a price list, then you would have to do a money transfer to order even the sample, this process would take a week to 10 days.

    I bet you can guess which company I ordered a sample from LOL.

    We sent an email inquiring about getting a sample, the email we got back said the sample was $5, the handling was $2.83 and the shipping was $9, but because they want me to try the product, they made the shipping on the bill -$9, and they had no problem with us paying COD, which is easy for us, yeah I like these guys.

    We ordered the sample Yesterday, they sent it via courier and it came today.

    Now I have to share how they sent it.....

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is a green tea can, I have removed the shipping label that was stuck on it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Inside the can there is a nice bubble wrapped bottle of the finish and an envelope with the invoice and a flyer about the finish.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The tea can is obviously used, I applaud their recycling in the most positive sense, this is a great way to send the sample bottle of finish to me.

    I can't wait to try it, I hope it works well, as I said, I'm very impressed with the company so far.

    Cheers
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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