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Thread: Dehumidifier

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
    Posts
    7,890

    Dehumidifier

    After 22 years of living in a high desert climate I've become rather spoiled, always feeling sorry for those of you that battle rust and swollen lumber. Now, I have those issues. All the items I built with drawers and brought with us need a bit of tuning as they stick...a lot. Every time I walk out to the garage I check to see if my equipment is beginning to feel the effects as well.

    I was wondering if any of you blessed to live in more humid climate utilize a dehumidifier in the shop. Are there plusses or minuses to having one in the shop? Once the shop is complete I will have a small AC unit but it will not run except when I am working there. So there needs to be some other way to keep the humidity in check.

    Been looking around and see that there is a rather large range of units available. Most are measured by the number of pints they are capable of removing in a single day. Some have circuitry that prevents freeze ups and still others have a pump that can remove the water so you do not have to dump the collection pan.

    What are you all using? What size or options are worth having?
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,019
    I have a hard concrete floor with a coating on it that is also hard and very sealed.

    When I open the doors in Mid summer high humidity the floor get wet. No not wet - it puddles. You would think I hosed it down.

    I will use a dehumiditor on those days, because the floor is very slippery.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,439
    My shop isn't heated/cooled so I keep things waxed and oiled frequently. I've also started using my dad's technique of keeping a sheet of luan/plywood cut to size on top of my TS and other metal tables. He did a light waxing once a year, but mostly to help keep plywood/boards sliding across the top smoothly. I had picked up his table from my BIL's shop a couple of years ago and being stored with that ply on top it looked as shiny as the day he stored it 15 years ago, where other exposed parts had gotten some surface rust.

    Since most of the tools aren't really exposed to rapid changing hot/cold conditions they typically don't get condensation on them anyway.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Florida Keys
    Posts
    85
    Well I live 500 yards off the Atlantic ocean and less than 50 yards from the Gulf of Mexico (the Keys are kind of narrow). The humidity right now is 74 and dew point is 77 (good and sticky). I've been using Bostik Top Cote for years. Spray it on let it dry and polish off. I do this regularity in summer months and not just floor tools but any tool with an unpainted surface or bear surface (hand saws, saw blades, etc.). Unlike what Darren said, if I leave a piece of wood on the table saw, I can expect to have light surface rust under the wood in just a day or two. I never leave wood on any of my floor tools for that reason. I also A/C my shop when I am working in it but a little cost prohibitive all the time. As for a dehumidifier in my location it would be a waste of time do to the humidity. It would be working flat out all the time. I generally do not have as big a problem as you would expect. When it gets hot it stays hot and cools in the winter very slowly. The lack of rapid temperature changes is what is all about. It really is those rainy days with extra high humidity that take the toll. One thing I do know is a I build drawers / doors tight because once the furniture is in the A/C they will loosen up.
    Last edited by Robert Rose; 08-11-2016 at 09:01 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    There is a lot of similarities between an AC and a Dehumidifier. (fans, coils, compressors.)
    Are they that much different in cost to run?

    (ie: I can't help wondering if you're getting the AC, why not just give it a modest set point and leave it on? )
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
    4,857
    No dehumidifier, but one of the great reasons I like my basement shop is that I have central air in my house so free air and humidity control in the shop, just checked and it is 72 upstairs and 64 in my shop, no wonder I like being down there

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    Basement shop here as well. I run a dehumidifier during July and August. Keeps it comfortable, about 56% humidity.
    My old one just kicked the bucket after 20 years.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    I've always had a portable dehumidifier in the shop for the worst days of the summer. Not only for the contents, but for me. I've also had a window A/C, and it doesn't seem to be any more expensive to run it versus the dehumidifier....the problem is that on some of the worst days, it isn't hot enough to make the AC run long stretches to dehumidify. In any case, I find them (dehumidifiers) indispensable, my problem has always been with their life expectancy; at least for the box store models. I think I had one last 5 years, but more typically it's 3 years +/-. I consider them a disposable appliance. There are some very good ones available, but they run 3-4 times the cost of the box store stuff.
    I long for the days when Coke was a cola and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard; 1939-2016)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    I have a hard concrete floor with a coating on it that is also hard and very sealed.

    When I open the doors in Mid summer high humidity the floor get wet. No not wet - it puddles. You would think I hosed it down.

    I will use a dehumiditor on those days, because the floor is very slippery.
    We had a warehouse floor in Houston that did that... it was really fun trying to take a forklift with a load across that floor without sliding off the dock...
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,992
    I don't have a dehumidifier, other than the window unit A/C I use during Summer. Even on a really humid day, a few minutes of operation makes my shop more comfortable.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

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