Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Traditional Wooden Double-Iron Planes - Update

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449

    Traditional Wooden Double-Iron Planes - Update

    A year ago Steve Voigt (a SMC regular) opened a new planemaking shop (Voigt Planes) specializing in making traditional double-iron planes. I thought that there might be a few here that might be interested in what he has to offer. I have heard a lot of good things about his planes.

    I know from my wooden moulding & rabbet planes the pleasure of working wood with wooden planes. It is a totally different feel than using metal planes.

    Sometimes the itch just needs to be scratched:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1011.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	42.2 KB 
ID:	96936Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1012.jpg 
Views:	40 
Size:	47.1 KB 
ID:	96937Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1013.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	49.4 KB 
ID:	96938Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1017.jpg 
Views:	40 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	96939
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 07-07-2017 at 01:57 AM.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,749
    These are great looking planes. By double iron I take it you mean laminated as some of my older wooden planes are. It's nice to see someone bringing back an old art.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    . That's a fancy looking woodie!

    He has a somewhat hidden link on his construction theories.
    http://www.voigtplanes.com/construction.html
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Tulk View Post
    These are great looking planes. By double iron I take it you mean laminated as some of my older wooden planes are. It's nice to see someone bringing back an old art.
    As Ryan's excellent link shows, by double iron, it means a blade with a cap iron.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    As Ryan's excellent link shows, by double iron, it means a blade with a cap iron.
    But not a regular cap iron...

    Do you think his changes he made improve the utility? It looks like its a bit steeper than a lot of cap irons, and I could see them being easier to get well seated to the blade (which I've had some trouble with especially on old planes that were ill treated in their previous life needing a fair bit of fettling to get to be happy). The tapered blades are also interesting, I'm guessing that the grinding on those is a decent chunk of his costs from what I've seen other folks talk about.

    I was also curious how you liked the try plane with the wider front and no front tote... I haven't actually used a plane that large with no front tote and was pondering what it meant as far as usage goes. My naive guess is that it might actually be beneficial because you wouldn't be tempted to pull up on it (something I'm pretty sure I'm occasionally guilty of based on some issues that sort of randomly pop up).
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    But not a regular cap iron...

    Do you think his changes he made improve the utility? It looks like its a bit steeper than a lot of cap irons, and I could see them being easier to get well seated to the blade (which I've had some trouble with especially on old planes that were ill treated in their previous life needing a fair bit of fettling to get to be happy).
    The cap iron curve looks fairly close to the sketches in The Tool Chest of Benjamin Seaton. I have the book, just took me a while to find it. While looking, I found Whenlen's The Wooden Plane and although it is not a cross section view, it appears to also have an abrupt curve for the wooden try plane in it. So I believe that it is not that unusual for that time period.

    Just to show some extreme curve, that a look at this picture I found. It appears to be from a metal plane which came some time after the time period of Seaton Hall which is the basis of Voigt's planes.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Record Cap Iron.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	64.7 KB 
ID:	96941


    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    I was also curious how you liked the try plane with the wider front and no front tote... I haven't actually used a plane that large with no front tote and was pondering what it meant as far as usage goes. My naive guess is that it might actually be beneficial because you wouldn't be tempted to pull up on it (something I'm pretty sure I'm occasionally guilty of based on some issues that sort of randomly pop up).
    I tried it out as soon it arrived and naturally held it at the front with my hand reversed facing to the back, similar to how I hold my hollows and rounds sometimes. Seemed to work well, but I really need more time working with it. Too hot the last couple of days (87 now) but it will be in the 70's Sunday, so I should be doing much more with it. I have a chore in mind that it will be perfect for.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Yeah, thinking about it I don't think the approach angle is a lot different than some/most of my planes because I've been putting a micro bevel on the cap iron as well to get a crisp fit. I read somewhere about doing that and it seemed to work pretty well so just kept it there Pretty interesting to see in use, generally I figure there was some reason things were done the way they were and we just have to figure out what it was (whether or not it ends up being what we want in the end is somewhat orthogonal, hard to decide that without figuring it out first). I don't see a lot of stuff like that locally so pretty fun to at least live a bit vicariously through other folks

    That would seem like the natural way to hold it overhead. My dad has an old woodie jack that the front knob was busted off of I used a bit, I was holding it from the side for edge jointing which seemed to work pretty well - basically just guiding the front. Obviously that didn't work as well for face jointing (and I can't recall what I did there). It does make me kind of wonder if the more "grab-able" front knob actually encourages some bad behavior in some cases.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,260
    Well that iron cap iron approach is not new. I have a wood coffin plane that originates from UK and its plane iron made by Mathieson is identical both in wedge thickness and width as well as cap iron.
    Paul sellers mentions the hard time Stanley et al had introducing metal planes to the market all those years ago and one reason was the feel and ease with which woodies moved over the surface.
    So i dont see anything hugely innovative in this plane Bill. Even the milling of the throat /blade support area has been standard fare for years.

    what i would like to explore in this area is Lee Valleys latest kits which enable putting a Norris adjuster into a wooden plane and be able to clamp down the cap like us done on a Norris instead of the hammer and wedge.
    i dont say it will be the be all and end all just fun experimenting.
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...21&cat=51&ap=1

    Enjoy the plane Bill. looks like a great buy and good on u for supporting a local tool producer.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449

    New Jack Plane

    Well I liked the Try Plane so much I ordered the Jack Plane in February. It just arrived this Monday. It is a beauty and works great. I have not had a chance to do much with it yet. The blade is ground with a 10" radius.

    You can see pictures of the Jack in action and details of the plane on Steve Voigt's Instragram here and here.

    Pictures of the Jack with the Try Plane.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1149.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	38.1 KB 
ID:	99564Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1150.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	51.0 KB 
ID:	99565Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1151.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	39.8 KB 
ID:	99566Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1152.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	42.0 KB 
ID:	99567Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1153.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	45.2 KB 
ID:	99568Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1154.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	57.1 KB 
ID:	99569
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,451
    That's a great looking plane, really like the details put into it.

    Sent from my SM-T710 using Tapatalk
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

Similar Threads

  1. Making Moulding Planes - Wooden Planes
    By Tom Becnel in forum Handtool Project Showcase
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-15-2012, 08:35 PM
  2. Makers marks on old wooden planes
    By Rob Keeble in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-19-2011, 11:25 AM
  3. More wooden hand planes-
    By edward alexander in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-02-2009, 12:24 PM
  4. Iron men & wooden ships
    By Bart Leetch in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-01-2007, 06:11 PM
  5. Wooden Planes
    By Owen Bostrom in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-03-2006, 04:13 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •