Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Spindle Tramming Gage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022

    Spindle Tramming Gage

    I made this today.

    It is functional, but not pretty yet.

    I will make it pretty after I get the machine settings set up via using this device.

    Ohhh - it is a tram to help me get the spindle perpendicular to the machine bed. I am going to shoot to be within .001 over 12" Right now, it is not even reasonably acceptable.

    It could be used on a drill press also.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Spindle Tram Gage.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	56.6 KB 
ID:	97044
    Last edited by Leo Voisine; 08-27-2016 at 05:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,702
    Ok, I'll bite and admit I'm not entirely sure how you're using it since everyone else seems shy today

    Also I'm curious (based on what I think I know) how this is better than simply milling a reference surface to match the spindle plane?
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    Ok, I'll bite and admit I'm not entirely sure how you're using it since everyone else seems shy today

    Also I'm curious (based on what I think I know) how this is better than simply milling a reference surface to match the spindle plane?

    I was wondering how long it was going to be before someone asked a question.

    Yes, I can run a cutter along the "X" axis and the "Y" axis. That will make the table relative to those 2 axis planes, BUT.

    NOW - the centerline of the spindle needs to be made "perpendicular" to the table top. If it is not perpendicular - neither will the cutter be, and more to the point - the face of the cutter will not be parallel to the table. That will manifest itself in grooves on the face of whatever is being cut that needs to be sanded out.

    When the centerline of the spindle is out of perpendicular - one edge of the cutter will cut deeper than the opposite edge.

    Does that make sense?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,702
    OK I think I'm getting the problem is basically if you move the head up and down you move the reference point.

    I'm still feeling a bit baffled about how you use this to measure that, I know it's "simple" geometry somehow but... I guess it's one of those days.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    OK I think I'm getting the problem is basically if you move the head up and down you move the reference point.

    I'm still feeling a bit baffled about how you use this to measure that, I know it's "simple" geometry somehow but... I guess it's one of those days.

    Tomorrow I will demonstrate.

    I have my foot on ice and cannot move around much right now.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,606
    Just seeing this.
    I can't get my head around having to worry about tolerances that tight when cutting wood. I'm not doubting you I just don't understand
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,702
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    Tomorrow I will demonstrate.

    I have my foot on ice and cannot move around much right now.
    No problem, thank you for taking the time to explain Do take care of the important stuff!!!! Hope the foot isn't causing to much issue.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,367
    I just saw this thread ... i will be making one of these as well ... my spindle is WAY out.

    As for the question of why so precise when cutting wood...

    When you go to flatten a surface with a cutter that's - say - 1-1/2" diameter - if the spindle center isn't perpendicular with the X and Y axis (maybe think of it as plumb) to a pretty good degree, it will leave a step as each pass steps over. it's worsened if the spindle is tilted along the axis perpendicular to the axis you're traveling while cutting (a lean along the X while cutting along the Y)...

    I just did some simple quick measuring - let's say leo detects 1/32" over 12" of outage on the X axis. Now take a 1-1/2" diameter cutter - 6" to the right along the X axis from the center of the cutter would be 1/64" taller and 6" to the left of the center would be 1/64" shorter than the center. Seems tiny, huh?

    Now if you flatten a board, traveling along the Y axis, with a 1-1/4" step-over, that translates to a .002893" step where the passes overlap (i could've used a larger stepover to make this more dramatic, but it doesn't matter. you can feel .003" and it takes a while to sand that out.

    and that was only 1/32" out over a foot ... now that doesn't seem like a lot - but without measuring, how do you know? 1/32" out would be unacceptable for me ... If i could dial it in to within .010", I'd be happier. I bet my spindle's worse than 1/32" which is why i'm gonna make this trammer ... plus, i'll be able to tram other things like my drill press and my milling machine

    Great post, leo!
    Last edited by Jason Beam; 08-28-2016 at 06:20 AM.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Carthage,Mo
    Posts
    887
    I can see the data. However in my late age doubt if I'll ever get that close. Very good piece of work.
    David

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022
    Carol and I were in my shop playing around with a piece of oak with a huge know in the middle - knot was about 6" diameter and facing it with a 1-1/2 cutter. One edge was cutting deeper than the opposite edge by, ohhh, maybe 1/64 - or a little more. The edge cutting deeper was leaving a groove in the face. The wood was too large for my jointer or planer. One side was rough sawn and we wanted it to stay rough sawn. We used a ROS to sand out the grooved face. We needed to use 40 grit first to get the bulk of the grooves out, then 60, then 120. It took a fair amount of effort to get that face flat and smooth.

    If the spindle was perpendicular as I hope to achieve, then a little ROS with 150 will be sufficient.

    Also - I don't cut only wood. I do cut plastics, aluminum, brass, HDU and anything else I can get - not steel.

    BUT - even on wood, it does make a difference.

    I will do a tutorial on this as it plagues a lot of folk and it's a little difficult to wrap yer head around it with good pictures and demonstrations.

    This is high on my list of priorities, so I will get to it soon. I am thinking within the next week or two.

Similar Threads

  1. Set of Stanley Gage Planes.....?
    By Stuart Ablett in forum Neander Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-20-2012, 02:56 PM
  2. Who needs a depth gage
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-15-2009, 03:14 PM
  3. Wixey Digital Angle gage
    By Ron Roase in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-12-2009, 09:57 PM
  4. Gage Boxes & Chess set Box
    By Gayl Beals in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-04-2008, 03:39 PM
  5. Knife Setting Gage
    By Reg Mitchell in forum New Tools
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-13-2006, 12:08 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •