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Thread: My Shopful of Old Iron

  1. #1

    My Shopful of Old Iron

    here are some pics of my shopful of oldies, i'll post pics of individual machines over the next couple of days

    so pic out and id the oldies!!

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    some will be obvious, some are more obscure Canadian machines but they were all available stateside, primarily at montgomery wards

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    2,614
    Hey! what is that Dewalt chop saw doing in there?

    Nice stuff you got there.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  3. #3
    that dewalt chopsaw is almost an oldie as well, it would actually be allowable on owwm under their rules(20+ years old, not asian origin)

    its 21 years old and made in the US!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
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    4,389
    I'd be suspicious if you used that shop or not if there wasn't that bucket of shorts in the one picture, the whole place is way to clean

    Its interesting how much more attractive the lines are on a lot of the old iron. I can't decide if its inherent or if its conditioning but things like that bandsaw sure are pretty. Thanks for sharing!
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  5. #5
    first is my 1940's Delta/Rockwell 1160 tilt top table saw

    i bought this a few years, it had been well taken care of but when i first saw it, it was a pile of parts on a pallet!! what a jigsaw puzzle

    the bearings had been replaced but with the wrong ones so the blade was way off centre in the slot and the blade wobbled like crazy.

    new bearings and truing up of the blade back washer solved those issues.

    i was fortunate to find NOS bearings, spindle and many other parts, most of which i didnt need

    i dont think the 1160 ever came with the cast iron base, i think that base is from a jointer. but it fits perfectly.

    the motor is a 30 yr old 2 hp, runs on 240 and is buried deep in the cast iron base.

    one issue with the 1160 is that its tippy because of the small footprint. i resolved that with the shopfox mobile base, its bolted to the cast iron base and is expanded to be larger on the right side

    tilties are somewhat different to use, but i dont even think of it anymore. the table also goes up and down for depth of cut which can be a nuisance if you use outfeed support, i use the ridgid fliptop stand when i need it.

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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    I'd be suspicious if you used that shop or not if there wasn't that bucket of shorts in the one picture, the whole place is way to clean

    Its interesting how much more attractive the lines are on a lot of the old iron. I can't decide if its inherent or if its conditioning but things like that bandsaw sure are pretty. Thanks for sharing!
    i does get used, everyday, and its not usually that neat and tidy. dust collection is always a pain, even more so on old stuff

    its a double car garage and the flooring is "wood" laminate, very easy to sweep and gentle on tools and old knees!

    this is my main jointer, late 40's beaver 3800. beaver tools were designed and made by the callander foundry in guelph, ontario, canada. rockwell bought the foundry and the beaver line of tools in 1954. many rockwell and delta tools were made there after that

    ive rebuilt 3 or 4 of these jointers, this one came out of an old very wet barn, a very rusty pile of parts. interesting design, the cutterhead and pulley are one piece and there is no spindle. the cutterhead runs on a pair of tapered roller bearings inserted into the main casting. a simple cleaning and repack with fresh grease brought them back. note the fence tilt system, that must have cost a fortune to make. its a shortbed jointer, the extensions were an option. rebuild was simple except for rust removal, tables were coplaner, all the parts were there

    its powered by an old wagner repulse induction motor(has starting brushes), i rebuilt that, although not much to do except a decent cleaning. the motor is mounted in the forward position to allow for a dc system under the jointer. the cabinet is shopmade using castiron legs that were available from beaver at the time

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    as far as pretty lines, i'll get a pic of my three bandsaws, modern ryobi, 1935 beaver and the 1915 crescent side by side!

  7. #7
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    for those who dont frequent the turning forum, here is my wood lathe

    its a 1940's henry power tools aka craftmaster "boat tail". 36 inch bed, 14 inch max dia. inboard

    powered by a Hoover 1hp with a 5 speed jackshaft and 4 speed head stock, motor is reversible(switch on the motor's side)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
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    4,389
    And a homemade hand wheel on the lathe unless I miss my guess. Looks like a sweet little turner.

    Love the cabinet under the jointer. That's some quality work and really fits in well with the overall antique equipment collection. The fence is indeed an interesting design, looks dang solid.
    Last edited by Ryan Mooney; 10-02-2016 at 12:10 AM. Reason: a word... some not summer
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  9. #9
    ive built several of those cabinets over the years, different sizes for diferent machines. down to two of them now, the jointer and a taller(longer leg) under my scrollsaw

    the "handwheel" on the outside of the headstock is actually a quick change faceplate, made by OneWay, there's another smaller faceplate to fit the same hub hanging on the cabinet. it does function as a handwheel too, although usually as a hand powered discbrake!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
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    4,389
    That works

    I didn't see anything setup on the outboard side for turning there? Might just be missing the setup though...
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

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