Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: How to restore this old vise....if at all?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,341

    How to restore this old vise....if at all?

    I found this old vise at a garage sale about 4 years ago for $5 and it has just been sitting on the floor of my garage ever since. I got it out tonight to see what it might take to make it useable again. Plenty of surface rust on it and no handle. I have no idea of it's age but I don't think it is a real valuable antique. Probable worth more than the $5 I paid though. I'm unsure if I should just wipe it off and leave the patina or do a full scrub and grinding down to the metal.
    It says it's from the Abernathy Vise and Tool Company Chicago Ill. No70. Roller Nut Rapid Acting Screw Vise. Then it has the letters (TAPPD FO). I don't know what that means. Where the handle goes it has the number 70A. Also on the front face it looks like there is some kind of insert (dog maybe). It does not move so I'm unsure of it as well.
    So use as is or grind it down clean?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3612 (Medium).JPG 
Views:	33 
Size:	121.0 KB 
ID:	98956Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3613 (Medium).JPG 
Views:	32 
Size:	113.0 KB 
ID:	98957Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3616 (Medium).JPG 
Views:	36 
Size:	96.4 KB 
ID:	98958Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3618 (Medium).JPG 
Views:	29 
Size:	82.3 KB 
ID:	98959Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3619 (Medium).JPG 
Views:	29 
Size:	109.5 KB 
ID:	98960
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,341
    I think the letters "TAPPD FO" is actually suppose to be "PAT APPD FOR"


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,627
    Doesn't look like its in to bad of shape to me. Put a little penetrating oil on the dog and see if it comes loose. The real kicker will be if the in and out action is good and you can get that rolling cleanly - I'm betting it won't be to bad.

    The only reference I can find to a valuation is as part of a complete bench that listed for a rather astonishing price of $3,400 (https://www.industrialartifacts.net/...iant=955594881) and it doesn't look to me like they went overboard on preserving the patina on that either (indeed it looks a bit over polished).

    Actually I see one for $70 on ebay.. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-Abernat...-/351478096643

    I guess based on that it depends on how you want it to look. I probably wouldn't bother sanding back, you could either vinegar or evaporust it (either will leave a bit of a black patina) and they either scrub and paint or just wax it depending on how you like it.
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,114
    What Ryan said. Work on getting it working. Then think about aesthetics. I think you have a gem here.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,233
    Yup, What Ryan said, shoot it with some liquid wrench penetration oil and let it sit for a day or two, should loosen up nicely. I'd probably try opening it up a little, then hit it with a little more fluid then try working it back and forth in short movements and repeating until you get full movement.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,952
    If it were mine I would do my best to clean up the surfaces and spray paint it with mu choice of color.

    As to the "stuck". Use generous amounts of penetrating oil and a large pipe that just fits in the "T" hole. GENTLY, move in one direction with the pipe and a noticeable but not breaking force. Then go back in the opposite direction. Back and forth - back and forth. You should start to feel a little movement after a while. Use generous amounts of penetrating fluid and plenty of elbow grease and patience. Don't get overly aggressive and break something. Remember - a vice can take some significant force, but is still breakable.

    For cleaning - do you have access to a sand blaster? Can you go to a local vocational school and have them sand blast it? You could use vinegar and a small wire brush, or navel jelly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,790
    Definitely worth saving and using. What Ryan said. Loosen up, make a handle and use. I would get rid of surface rust but would clean the jaw faces well. Other than that, use will preserve. Enjoy.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,341
    Well....I started to get it cleaned up tonight only to realize now that the "nut" from the underside is missing. Not knowing anything about this vise I didn't even realize there should have been one. I'll have to search the internet and see if I can find one once I know for sure what it is. It is cleaning up nicely though. The "dog" was rusted shut pretty tight but finally got it to open after about 2 hours of working on it. I hope I can find the part to make this useable again.
    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,627
    Here's the patent (or what I think may be the patent anyway..) - it might be helpful in deducing how the "Roller Nut" part worked.. It seems to be some variant of the "reverse is release" mechanism that's available on some modern vises.. My guess is that finding a drop in piece might be pretty difficult but who knows, you might be able to fashion something depending on the thread... Here's hoping!

    https://patentimages.storage.googlea.../US1140646.pdf
    Love thy neighbor, yet pull down not thy hedge.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    outside of Toronto, Ont
    Posts
    171
    Good to hear that you got it moving Tom. The mention of the rust reminded me of a guy who grew up on a farm saying that when his father wanted to restore a rusted cultivator, he threw it into the bottom of a pond for maybe a week. When he hauled it out, the nuts and bolts came part as if they were new. No idea how that worked.

Similar Threads

  1. Another furniture restore
    By Darren Wright in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 04-11-2017, 07:16 PM
  2. ZCI Restore with Epoxy
    By glenn bradley in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-13-2015, 12:15 AM
  3. Plane Restore
    By Darren Wright in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-28-2011, 08:42 PM
  4. Organ Restore
    By Bernie Weishapl in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-29-2010, 07:45 PM
  5. Tail Vise VS Shoulder Vise
    By Rich Aldrich in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-30-2008, 12:44 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •