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Thread: Idle tools question.

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Idle tools question.

    OK folks,
    now that my new shop is on the relatively near horizon...
    I got to wondering... my shop tools have been Idle and in my rented storage unit for just over a year now. Other than 'rusty' habits on the user side, is there anything I should be careful about once I get them in the new shop? I'm mostly concerned with the core tools: Tablesaw, Planer and Drill Press.
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Well, first of all Ned, I would dust them off while talking to them in quiet, soothing tones. They will have been without human contact for quite a while and they will need to be gently reintroduced back into the woodworking society.

    After getting them used to your touch again, you might try massaging their tables with some nice, expensive wax and giving their moving parts some fancy lube.






    Just a thought................
    Thanks, Mark.

    Custom Bonehead.

    My diet is working good. I'm down to needing just one chair now.

    "Just think how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of them are even stupider!" --George Carlin

  3. #3
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    In addition to Mark's suggestions , I'd check any belts to be sure they're not dried and cracked, blow out any dust, lube the slippery parts and clean the non-slippery parts, then re-check the alignment of key things like tables, blades, and fences. Then start getting it all dirty again.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
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    Good advice above. When I brought mine stuff out of storage some of the long threads were pretty well caked with sawdust (e.g., planer height mechanism, table saw height adjuster, etc.) An old toothbrush and a mild cleanser, like simple green will do the job. Follow up with a dry lube (e.g. dri-cote) that will not attract saw dust. I should have done that before storing them, but better late than never.

    Also, check your jigs and squares for square and fix or toss any that aren't square.

    One more thing. If you have tools you don't use that often, put them in a separate box and check every six months or so for something that ought to be eliminated. As our skill levels and interests grow and change, we (or at least I) wind up using valuable shop space for stuff that just ain't earning its keep!
    Don't believe everything you think!

  5. #5
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    Check the power cords for critter nibbles.
    Jim

  6. #6
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    and check the tools for critters that do the nibbling!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    and check the tools for critters that do the nibbling!
    I think I would start with this piece of advice.
    Jim

  8. #8
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    In order:

    Check for black widows or worse.
    Check all rubber parts for failure (yes, the power cords and switches too).
    Check all lubricants for hardening.
    Replace failures as required, de-rust, wax and enjoy.

  9. #9
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    They already coverd everything I was thinking( small mind). Put for any remaing items, you can use catlitter crystals in a pair of pantyhose to keep the moisture away. Take your time and make sure you check everything real well. It only takes a small peices of missing insulation to start problems.

  10. #10
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    Critters, and worn parts, check!

    Still a few weeks away (at least) from having to drag everything up from the storage unit to the home 20, though.
    -Ned

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