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Thread: Shaker wall clock

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Constantine, MI
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    Shaker wall clock

    My next build is a shaker wall clock in walnut. Based on the new yankee workshop version Norm built way back in the beginning of his tv show, it comes from a design that came out of Mount Lebanon in 1840. I'll make a couple of very small changes, but stay as true to the design as possible.

    It stands just under 34" tall and 12" wide. Lots of interesting mortise and tenon joinery on the doors and the back is from a single board. I redrew the entire plan in sketchup to familiarize myself with all the dimensions and joinery.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    In prepping the stock I came across some really nice figure that I saved for the sides of the case and the door panel. This should be a fun build.



    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
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  2. #2
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    thanx for sharing this build rennie, looking forward to a beautifully crafted finished project
    Human Test Dummy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Oliver Springs, TN
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    1,711
    First "real" woodworking project I built. Mine was mahogany that I recycled from an old dresser that me in my ignorance thought was cherry! I've built a couple since and always enjoy making them. I can't wait to see yours in walnut.

  4. #4
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    Looking forward to watching this one happen, Rennie.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Nov 2006
    Location
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    Does anyone else do this?

    Like everyone, I map out what parts are coming from each part of a board prior to rough cutting to length. Usually a pencil on light woods, chalk on dark woods. Of course, the first trip through the jointer or planer obliterates those markings and you might be left with a guessing game that might spell disaster later in the process. So, I've begun using a sharpie on the ends of the boards after they are cut to length. I mark both the part name and the final thickness and remember to look before sending it through the planer. I also try to write as close to center on the end grain so the markings won't disappear as the board gets thinner.

    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Carthage,Mo
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    Used chalk in past and it usually rubs off. Now to get the white sharpie. Try to mark all my pieces as Murphy has jumped up a time or two and screwed up the build.
    I like the end marking idea.
    David

  7. #7
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    Nov 2006
    Location
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    Got the case cut, joinery done and put a coat of danish oil on the interior parts of the case. Too late did I do research on finishing walnut to find out many prefer a tung oil varnish. I like the way the danish oil brings up the color and grain of the walnut, but I am concerned about a top coat. Really do not want to use a poly or lacquer. Was thinking about staying with the danish oil and then paste wax after it has dried for several days. Also though about using the tung oil varnish over the danish oil.

    Any thoughts?

    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 09-20-2017 at 05:14 PM.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
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  8. #8
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    May 2007
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    Looking good, Rennie! For most of my work with walnut and cherry, I've made my own "Danish oil" mixture: BLO/Naphtha/Polyurethane in a 1/1/1 ratio - rub it in and rub it off before it dries. Three coats give it a nice look. Sometimes, I make the final coat a 1/1/2 ratio for a tougher finish.

    I've used a little tung oil on a few items but it's always the first thing to go on because it soaks in easier. Not sure about tung oil on top of a previous layer of anything.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member
    Member of Mensa
    Live every day like it's your last, but don't forget to stop and smell the roses.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Arnold View Post
    Looking good, Rennie! For most of my work with walnut and cherry, I've made my own "Danish oil" mixture: BLO/Naphtha/Polyurethane in a 1/1/1 ratio - rub it in and rub it off before it dries. Three coats give it a nice look. Sometimes, I make the final coat a 1/1/2 ratio for a tougher finish.

    I've used a little tung oil on a few items but it's always the first thing to go on because it soaks in easier. Not sure about tung oil on top of a previous layer of anything.
    Thanks Bill, it hadn't occurred to me to add poly to the mix. Will have to experiment with that. I haven't use danish oil in a while but I seem to remember that several coats can build a low luster sheen which is what I am after.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
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  10. #10
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    According to Bob Flexner, "Danish Oil" is a mixture of oil, varnish and thinner. Contrary to the directions on the can, he recommends applying a first coat; then after wiping it, letting it dry overnight; then sanding lightly and applying a second (and subsequent) coat, wiping, and letting it/them dry overnight.

    With three coats, I've achieved a pretty nice, low-sheen finish. YMMV...
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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