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Thread: Iron men & wooden ships

  1. #1
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    Iron men & wooden ships

    Back in the days when ships were made of wood & men were made of iron there was this sea faring Captain & his crew just sailing along when the call from the crows nest came Sail HO. The captain asked the cabin boy to get his glass & when he looked it was the enemy. He called to the cabin boy get my red jacket then the turned about & a bloody battle ensued during which the captain was wounded but the jacket kept his wound from being noticed & he fought on & they won the battle. Afterwords the cabin boy said now I understand why captains wear a red jacket.

    A day or so later the call came again from the crows nest Sail HO the captain asked for his glass & after looking astern & seeing a whole enemy fleet he turned to the cabin boy & said boy get my brown pants.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  2. #2
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    LOL!
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
    friend...if you have one."
    --George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

    "Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second..if there is
    one."
    --Winston Churchill, in response




  3. #3
    Don Taylor is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    That one I like!

    Good one Bart
    DT

  4. #4
    That was pretty good.

    I know this was a joke, and I do not want to detract from that, but recently I did a webpage on my website regarding an old granite and brick fort that is located near my house. Its the original Fort Knox and located in Prospect, Maine.

    We grew up visiting this place, so it has a lot of fond memories for me. One thing that always impressed me was the hot shot furnaces. It was this brick oven that held cannonballs. The furnace would be fired with Coke and then the balls would roll down the incline and get red hot. Loaded with tongs into 15 and 30 pound cannons, they would be lobbed at the wooden hulls of ships to catch them on fire. This fort never fired a shot, but could you imagine the carnage and devastation from having 100 cannons lined up and firing down on your ship? I guess that is why no ship dared tread north to Bangor.

    Since this is in the off-topic section I think it is okay to leave a link of this place. Its not really woodwork related, but look beyond the fort itself and check out the level of masonry skills. Can you imagine laying brick and granite block in archways coming together at four different points? They did a great job, and this was in the 1850's. Well here is the link to that fort (there are two pages of pictures) and a picture of that hot shot furnace.

    Fort Knox I

    Fort Knox II

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis S Johnson View Post
    That was pretty good.
    Can you imagine laying brick and granite block in archways coming together at four different points? They did a great job, and this was in the 1850's. Well here is the link to that fort (there are two pages of pictures) and a picture of that hot shot furnace.

    Fort Knox I
    Travis, your description of the archways coming together from 4 different sides, (if that was what you were describing), reminds me of the ceilings in a building that is under the south end of the Golden Gate Bridge in SFO that was (and still is, I think), a part of the Fort there. I think this building housed the powder and balls for the cannons, and maybe even the cannons themselves that were used to protect the entrance to the bay. I guess that method of construction must have been the Spec during that era, for it's strength to hold the thick mortar and stonework above it to protect the artillary and ammo. It is quite impressive as there are "many" small "rooms" adjoining each other with open arches looking out to the bay.
    Last edited by Stuart Ablett; 06-01-2007 at 03:17 AM.

  6. #6
    This was what I was referring too, though the picture here lacks what it looks like in real life.

    This Fort was part of the early American defense system so I would not be surprised if the fort you refer to was designed by the same naval fort architect. Forts like this were placed along the major interests that the nation wanted protected. Today protecting Bangor seems crazy, but at the time it was the biggest lumber capital in the world.

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  7. #7
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    Might be off topic, but that is what we have an off topic forum for!

    VERY cool, I'd love to see that in person, thanks for the mini tour!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Very funny, Bart...

    Reminds me of the line in Jaws when they finally see the actual size and power of the shark....."We're gonna need a bigger boat"...



    P.S. I bet you've been to Ft. Casey a few times, right Bart?
    Last edited by Greg Cook; 06-01-2007 at 12:47 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Cook View Post

    Very funny, Bart...

    Reminds me of the line in Jaws when they finally see the actual size and power of the shark....."We're gonna need a bigger boat"...



    P.S. I bet you've been to Ft. Casey a few times, right Bart?

    Once or twice.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  10. #10
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    That's an interesting story. For a couple reasons, I collect cannons and understand some of the history of arches. Arches go back many centuries. A wooden support was built, the stones or bricks laid on top and 'locked' with a keystone then the wood support was removed. Not completely off-topic for a wood working forum. Below is my first cannon. I found it in the barn of an abandoned farm in Michigan when I was about eight years old. It didn't have any wheels but there were distinct wear marks where the original wheels had been. I cut out new wheels with a coping saw, soaked with dark stain and screwed on with all-thread and a couple bolts. They remain to this day, sixty years later. A cannon expert has told me the cannon dates to 1800-1820 and was a signal cannon, not for shooting shot. I fired it on the 4th of July for many years and still do occasionally.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

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