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Thread: Something a bit different......but HOT!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Something a bit different......but HOT!!!

    I was fooling around with a larger forge a while back which did work well, but I needed to use a different set up.

    I had this one Isolite fire brick here, so I thought I'd make a one brick forge

    Attachment 9709 Attachment 9710
    I wired the brick together, as they usually do crack in use, I also built a frame around it just to make it easier to keep in one piece.

    Attachment 9711
    Here is it with the torch fired up

    Attachment 9712
    Here it is after one minute

    Attachment 9713
    No I insert a piece of steel in there

    Attachment 9714

    ....and after two minutes or so, I have a nice cherry red piece of steel to work.

    I can use this to heat up steel to bend it, or even to shape it with a hammer.

    The block cost about $6 here, I had the torch and the wire etc, so the cost is minimal.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    You'll be forging those neat Japanese chisels in no time! I poke around in the neander forums and love seeing some of the tools they are making and can see where something like that would come in handy for making your own knife blades , plane irons, chisels, etc...

    I don't know how you manage to do everything you do and still have, at least a couple minutes, of time to sleep!

  3. #3
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    Thanks Ed

    This forge was originally designed by a knife builder.

    I'm going to use it to heat up steel so I can shape it, I have no illusions of doing much more than that!

    Sleep, I get a few hours here and there, but the main thing I do that that saves me time is the TV, I VERY seldom spend any time in front of it.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Delton, Michigan
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    GAS CAN???

    what is that gas yur using stu? my brother is intersted in your apparatus.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
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    Just plain old LPG, MAP gas would be hotter, but these LPG canisters I get for about $4 each, the MAP gas are about $14.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
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    Nice Job Stu

    It looks like you will be adding on "Blacksmith" on to your impressive list of accomplishments.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  7. #7
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Good stuff Stu! I used a micro-forge the first time I smashed up a j-hook, at the local BAG-A-THON (Bay Area Galoots).

    One comment is that if you turn down the flame so it will circulate, and preferable create a swirling motion inside the chamber, it will get hotter and be easier to heat stock up with.

    Seems the torch you're using might be too strong, with it's directional flame.

    I've made quite a few mods to my propane forge as of recent, raising the floor up 2" and creating movable walls for front/rear to allow the ability to change the size of the chamber. I can get fairly large stock (2" thick for instance) up to a bright orange quickly.


  8. #8
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    I was hoping you'd chime in Alan!

    that is one good looking forge you got going there, use it much?

    I thought you were using the coal fired one?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I was hoping you'd chime in Alan!

    that is one good looking forge you got going there, use it much?

    I thought you were using the coal fired one?

    Cheers!
    Stu, I haven't used it too much yet, have been busy getting it tuned up and working properly, and still have one small leak in one of the NPT connections that I need to attend to. It heats fairly big stock up pretty quickly.

    I have used coal quite a bit to learn to forge with, and have used some charcoal at home as well, but have just not been able to get a hot enough fire with charcoal at home, and I think it's because my firepot is not very deep.

    I hate to admit, but propane is very nice in many ways, and much less in the way of scaling. It's better suited for tools and such, for most people at home.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, I guess propane is way cleaner than coal etc. which would be more "User Friendly" in a home workshop enviroment.

    I did reposition the torch, like you said, and it made a big difference.

    Attachment 9725 Attachment 9726 Attachment 9727

    I also found out that by pointing the torch to the back or the front, I could direct the heat to the part I was heating up.

    Attachment 9728
    You can really see how hot it is getting in there now!

    Attachment 9729
    I heated up this bar, a piece of 8mm high carbon drill rod.....

    Attachment 9733
    ....then pounded it on my anvil, I'm going to try to make a "Hook Tool" for use on the lathe.

    Attachment 9730 Attachment 9731

    From here, I'll have to do some grinding and sharpening, and give it a whirl



    One last "Dark" shot, just for fun

    Attachment 9732

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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