Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: The Most Popular Wood

  1. #1

    The Most Popular Wood

    I am not sure if this is a general question or one that belongs in the Design Sub-Forum. Either way I was thinking of some new cradle designs I thought would sell, and sell well, but I don't want to go through the expense and pain of buying wood and laboring with a project only to find out that it will only sell to the right person. At the same time I don't want to pound my way literally through Oak if building somthing out of White Pine sells just as well.

    So my question is, if I made some cradles what should I use for wood? Light or Dark? Hard or Soft? Native or Exotic? Etc, Etc, Etc
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    I would go with a hard wood. Esentially because it will take more abuse than a softwood will. I would also lean toward native woods for a cradle. I recently read something about some people having allergies to ceritain types of wood. This seems to be perdominatly the exotic woods. I personally wouldn't want to take a chance like that on a cradle for a little one.

    just my 1.5 cents worth.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    4,999
    A lot will depend on the nature of your design, and the existing decor/style of your potential customers.

    That said, Oak, Walnut, and Cherry are always popular, and maybe maple. If it's to be painted - and many people might want paint on their nursery furniture - then poplar would be a good choice.

    Are you planning to build a few and place them in stores, or display a few at craft shows and take orders? Either way, you might want to start with at least one from each kind of wood you'll offer, and let sales/orders guide you for follow-up production.

    I think, were it me, I'd start with one in Oak, one in Cherry, and one in Poplar, painted white. See what the market likes...
    Jim D.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mt
    Posts
    688
    Hard to tell. I think you would need very clear wood. Customers would probably be scared off by any knots or other "features". Highly figured wood is probably overkill. I wouldn't rule out good white pine. Depending on the design, you can probably use a lot of the not-so-clear parts for spindles or slats....

    It really has more to do with your customers' taste and what else is in the nursery than any intrinsic quality of the wood. I have heard from a few sources that lots of folks are "tired" of oak...

    Why not make a few samples using different woods/finishes and see what sells?
    Don't believe everything you think!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    8,983
    Hardwoods will command a higher price. Lighter woods like maple will take a greater variety of stains more easily. Some woods are a "look" and will be more specific to taste; cherry, walnut or any specific "looking" wood. On the other hand cherry and walnut will finish beautifully with just a simple oil and top coat appropriate to children's furniture. Pine and cedar (although I personally use them and love that look) are soft and can "feel" cheaper to the uneducated. JMHO

    This can also be geographically significant. On the left coast red oak or white oak with a golden finish are very common and fit in a lot of homes. Colonial maple finished pieces are also dominant here. Play to your audience. Shop a bunch of furniture stores and ask the sales folks what stuff moves well. If you are doing this over the web and therefore soliciting a broader audience, I would make a demo unit out of cherry, oak and pine and let your customer demand drive your material purchases.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 07-01-2007 at 07:27 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  6. #6
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    FWIW, it should be sacrelige to paint wood. There, I said it.

    All wood is good, but my personal favorite is walnut. I love the density, it cuts well, carves well, is forgiving, it's just wonderful wood to work with, IMO.

    I also like cherry for the same reason, those are my very favorites, and hard maple is not too bad IMO.

    While pine is a softwood, I like it for different things and is common as a theme in folks homes.

    If I had my choice to pick, walnut, cherry, and maple are my faves, in that order.

  7. #7
    I guess I could have explained myself better, what I was thinking of doing was building high end, very customized wooden cradles. Kind of like my daughters train cradle, but on other themes like bulldozers, tractors, trains, race cars, trucks, boats, etc.

    I would have to charge quite a bit I know, but I do not want to go through so much time and effort only to have a cradle linger in my shop for years. This is what happens with the custom wooden models I make. They just collect dust in my shop forever.

    I enjoyed the challenge and creativeness of building my daughters cradle, and thought maybe instead of making items that never sell, I would make something someone would be more eager to buy. Of course that idea would be futile if I used a type of wood that no one wanted.

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis S Johnson View Post
    I guess I could have explained myself better, what I was thinking of doing was building high end, very customized wooden cradles. Kind of like my daughters train cradle, but on other themes like bulldozers, tractors, trains, race cars, trucks, boats, etc.

    I would have to charge quite a bit I know, but I do not want to go through so much time and effort only to have a cradle linger in my shop for years. This is what happens with the custom wooden models I make. They just collect dust in my shop forever.

    I enjoyed the challenge and creativeness of building my daughters cradle, and thought maybe instead of making items that never sell, I would make something someone would be more eager to buy. Of course that idea would be futile if I used a type of wood that no one wanted.
    Travis,

    That is the coolest cradle I have ever seen!
    I though you were initially talking about traditional style cradles.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    97
    I think with a design like that you want to incorporate some different coloured wood into the details. Maybe maple with walnut trim or something? Make the different colours part of the design.
    Exotic wood is probably an overkill, people wont buy it because of the wood species, they will buy it because it looks like a train. Having said that, using something different/interesting for trim/details can work.

    Cheers

    Ian

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
    Posts
    4,992
    travis, i`d stick to domestic hardwoods and like has allready been suggested use natures color pallet for the various parts. something that is a good marketing tool is a natural, nontoxic finish like schellac and wax or oil-n-wax. more and more folks are paying attention to what chemicals they intentionally put into their babys immediate enviornment so taunting a "safe" finish might be wise....
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

Similar Threads

  1. Buy Popular Request
    By Les Elm in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-14-2011, 02:06 AM
  2. Buy Popular Request ........
    By Les Elm in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-09-2011, 03:55 PM
  3. By Popular Demand
    By Jeff Horton in forum Old Iron
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-07-2007, 11:47 PM
  4. staining popular
    By Fred Pilkington in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-21-2007, 04:32 PM
  5. Most Popular Router Bit
    By Jim Young in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-27-2007, 01:55 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •