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Thread: Rookie learning Part 01 - Grinding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Elgin, IL
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    442

    Rookie learning Part 01 - Grinding

    First of all, I would like to thank everybody ahead of time. I'm sure somebody will get tired of me asking all these questions I'm going to have.

    As I'm reading my homework assignment "Woodturning - A Foundation Course" by Keith Rowley he is talking about sharp tools and every woodturner to be successful needs to learn how to do things properly.

    I have the following grinder that I've never used (picked it up at Lowe's on a closeout for $25), looked like a good deal. I also picked up a stationary stand for this.

    Attachment 10357

    I'm also looking at getting something like one of these.

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/lcgrind4.html

    http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=1998

    The question I have is. Are the grinding wheels that are standard (grinding and white friable sharpening wheels) on the grinder sufficient for what I need to do, or do I need to get something else. I don't mind spending some money to get the correct thing, if needed.

    Also, since the grinder I have is a variable speed (2000 - 3450 RPM) - What speed should I be using?

    Or do I need a different grinder all together?

    Regards,

    Randy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    1,325
    That one should do reasonably well. I'd probably keep it on the lowest speed.

    I forget what grit the white wheel is, but it should be relatively suitable. The gray wheel might do for VERY rough shaping (like changing a bevel angle, or profile).

    The grinder I (and almost every turner I know personally) have is the Woodcraft Slow Speed that goes on sale for 75 from time to time. It comes with two white wheels: 60 grit and 120 grit. I use the 60 when I need to grind away a lot of steel and the 120 leaves a pretty good edge. It's my go-to wheel most of the time. Especially since I find that sharpening is a frequent task with turning.

    The Jigs you linked to are helpful. The wolverine is the most popular in my area, I think. Since I'm a tightwad, I went off and built my own jig that mimics the wolverine a bit. I have pictures here:

    http://www.sacramentoareawoodworkers...s.php?album=14

    It works very well, but I plan to rework the aluminum angle pieces. Cutting the slot was dangerous on the router table, and it isn't very smooth, so I intend to use something else. I'd found some steel pipe that fits into a larger piece that should work well.


    You'll likely get many suggestions about sharpening. Ask 5 turners about sharpening and you'll get at least 9 opinions. Honing vs. not honing is a big debate and I'll tell you up front that I don't hone - mostly because the time invested doesn't seem worth the trouble to me. I get plenty smooth cuts without it. It's what works for me
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
    Randy.....I grind on a Woodcraft slowspeed grinder. I use an Indian teardrop shaped stone to knock the burrs off my gouges. Just a couple of licks to knowck of the burrs. I do, in fact, hone my skew using a diamond hone. At the urging of Chris Barton, I spent a number of days learning to use my skew and since, fallen in love with it. It is one of, if not, my most used tools. I just bought a 5/8" and 1/ 1/4" Lacer skew and have ordered a special diamond hone for them....bigger to keep my meat hooks away from their sharp edges.

    I have the entire Wolverine jig setup and wouldn't be without it. It allows a beginner like me to spend more time learning to turn and less time learning to sharpen

    I will, however, have to learn to sharpen the Lacer skews by hand because they are curved.

    Good luck!

    Ken

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Randy, I'm another one of the guys with the 1750 RPM grinder from Woodcraft, but yours will do just fine at the slowest speed. (A lot of guys sharpen at 3500 RPM, but I think the consensus is slower is better.)

    I also highly recommend a sharpening jig. I have the Penn State model you pointed to, and I think it's great bang for the buck. I suspect it's not quite as refined as the Wolverine jig, but functionally it's virtually identical. And at about 2/3 the cost, by the time you buy all the extra pieces for the Wolverine setup. I'd buy it again.

    I'd invest the money saved in better grinding wheels and/or a wheel balancing kit. The Oneway wheels and balancing kit are top of the line, and priced to match. I like mine, but the wallet does still sting a little bit. A set of white or pink Norton wheels are more affordable, and would be a good replacement for the wheels on your grinder (especially the darker wheel...as Jason said, that one's gonna likely to be too coarse and hard for turning tools). You might not need to replace the white wheel immediately. I also recommend a diamond wheel dresser. You can get the "T" shaped dressers pretty inexpensively, or spend more money for a single-point dresser. I went with the cheaper "T" version, and it works for me.

    And by the way, no apologies necessary for any questions like this. You're not only getting answers for yourself, but for countless others now and in the future who might have the same questions. That's what this place is here for. And before you know it, you'll be jumping in and giving answers yourself. I was in your shoes about a year ago.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Randy......About 1 1/2 years ago Vaughn sent me a set of HF turning tools because he had no use for them. 6 months later he was turning!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Elgin, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Randy......About 1 1/2 years ago Vaughn sent me a set of HF turning tools because he had no use for them. 6 months later he was turning!
    Did you send them back?

    Randy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Jiutepec Morelos, Mexico
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    "You're not only getting answers for yourself, but for countless others now and in the future who might have the same questions. "

    Vaughn, I am one of them.
    Saludos
    Alfredo

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central NY State
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    3,362
    Randy,
    We've got the same grinder. It works pretty well, and is a good starting point. Before you drop some serious cash on a wolverine, I'd humbly suggest you make your own like Jason did. My son Ben, [the turner among the two of us] is pretty happy with the home made jig I made, which is alot more crude than Jason's. [BTW, Jason, your shop is too clean].

    Seems to my simple mind that honing a turning tool is like cleaning the treads on your tires. Alot of work for little return. But then, I am a really lousy turner.

    All the best,
    Ken

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by randy street View Post
    Did you send them back?

    Randy
    Nope! They're on the diving board along with my Robert Larson's, Robert Sorby's, Hamlet Lacer's, Pinnacles, and Henry Taylor's and my Jamieson HF set............. I do believe I offered to return them and Vaughn turned it down.

    Did anybody mention that turning tools are like money?.....there is no such thing as having too much!.....or that having too many turning tools is why one doesn't have to worry about having too much money?
    Last edited by Stuart Ablett; 07-04-2007 at 04:42 AM. Reason: Fixed a "Quote" tag

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post

    BTW, Jason, your shop is too clean


    Oh jeeze ... i gotta take pics more often ... all that is gone, now. I just cleaned things a bit the other day because I couldn't find the TS (it was under about 100bf of future furniture). Now it's kinda clean, but not quite functional yet - i have to run my dust collection ducting ... hopefully tomorrow. Then things will be a bit more useful. I don't like working without my DC
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

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