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Thread: j-line tablesaw

  1. #1

    j-line tablesaw

    I found a old j-line saw for sale. Anyone know if they are good saws.

  2. #2
    James,
    There is a bunch of info over on OWWM.com. The J-line was made by Yates-American.
    http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/detail.asp?ID=782

    There is a discussion group there as well.

    Wes

  3. #3
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    I love J-Line tools. But from what I have read the table saws were not generally a good machine. OF COURSE, there may be more than one model. I am not familiar with all they offer. But my advice is read up on them before you do anything.

    BTW moving this to Old Iron since this isn't a new tool

    Jeff
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
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  4. #4
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    The YA J-line being a "not generally a good machine" is relative. Some were made of sheet steel, but they're heavy duty and the tables are solid.

    Certainly you shouldn't expect one to be in the same category as my YA G-89, but they're quite capable. I would think the J-Line is every bit as capable as a Delta unisaw, maybe more depending on the model. There's a lot of combo machines, having a table saw, jointer, and/or sander together, but those are typically the W-line. Those will not be as robust as a machine with a single purpose, most likely, but again, if you have ever seen the tables of the J-line, they're pretty hefty.

    If you're looking at a J-125 10" table saw, I have the factory brochure, parts list, and parts and instructions from a 50s catalog of J-line machines. Let me know, I could probably scan it for you.

    And to answer your question if they're good or not...I know of no bad Yates American machines, all were excellent quality, some of the best. YMMV...all milage varies.

  5. #5
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    Finally found what I was thinking about. I have never seen one so can't comment on them.

    J-Line cabient saw
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Bischel View Post
    James,
    There is a bunch of info over on OWWM.com. The J-line was made by Yates-American.
    http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/detail.asp?ID=782
    Missed this, they were also made by Brodhead Garret too. That is the tablesaw I was thinking of that didn't sound so good.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  7. #7
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Jeff,

    That looks like a J-125 at that link, but it's missing the table extentions, fence, and miter. The 125 was belt driven, similar to other cabinet saws made out of sheet steel. There was a 9" extention on the left, a 17.75" extention to the right, and another open extention that would accept a wood insert which is an additional 19.25" (also to the right), and there is a leg for the right extention(s).

    In the brochure it says it will rip to the center of a 50 1/4" panel, and saw stock 3 1/8" thick. Table is normalized, closed grain, heavily ribbed cast iron table, as described in the factory literature.

    In addition to that, there was a 3HP motor on the J-125.

    The guard that goes on the saw has ball bearings and roller bearings for smooth operation, also missing from the saw you linked to.

    The J-125 will cut 3 1/8" depth at 90 degress, and 2 3/16" at 45 degrees.

    The original fence is setup to accept a wooden face for use with a moulding cutter head.

    As you know from your J-line Lathe, the J-line is built pretty well.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post
    Missed this, they were also made by Brodhead Garret too. That is the tablesaw I was thinking of that didn't sound so good.
    I didn't know that. I always came across the YA versions. Good info Jeff.
    Thanks, Wes

  9. #9
    I was out of town for a few days. I will go see the saw in the mourning. http://raleigh.craigslist.org/tls/376830733.html Thanks for the replays.

  10. #10
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Lavinder View Post
    I was out of town for a few days. I will go see the saw in the mourning. http://raleigh.craigslist.org/tls/376830733.html Thanks for the replays.
    Looks like a good buy to me. I don't think you'll go wrong at that price, and maybe you can get it for less.

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