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Thread: Why do we all hate drywall so much?

  1. #1

    Why do we all hate drywall so much?

    What is it about drywall that makes everyone hate it?

    As a machinist I work to tolerances of .001 and .0001 on a good day, you would think working with a sheet of paper bonded limestone 32 feet square that needs to be within the width of drywall tape (1.875) would be gosh darn easy. Let me tell you right now...its not.

    No matter how carefully I measure, my joints are still gapped, the screws pull through the sheets and they are far more heavy then they need to be.

    Maybe its just the material itself, it has just about every conceivable property OPPOSITE than wood. It has no grain at all. It has no strength in any load configuration. It's hardly renewable (the paper backing aside), and does not change with humidity. It also has the same color and consistency throughout a sheet and even from sheet to sheet and brand to brand. Adding to that, the stuff is brittle as glass, as dusty as a hay barn being filled with hay, and still looks like what hay looks like after it is processed by the horse after its all put up.

    I need to get this drywalling done so I can get to the ceilings and work with real wood. Wood that has color, figure and grain. Wood that was milled out by my neighbors and harvested by my old logging friends. Yes white pine vee-matched that looks sharp and is processed by the local sawmill. Yep, drywall is...well...dry!!
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    mornin` travis....having fun with sheetrock i take it?.......look at it this way, if your wife where to paint painstakingly installed wood you`d have a fit...with drywall she can change colors as often as she wants and it just doesn`t matter ...tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    WNY, Buffalo Area
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    I totally agree.

    I try to avoid drywall as much as possible. My biggest point of frustration with the stuff is doing the seams. No matter how much I try I can never get it as good as I would like it to turn out.

    Not to mention the dust created from sanding my mistakes down. That stuff makes wood dust seem like a fresh breath of country air.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  4. #4
    And you haven't begun to tape it yet! If you can find some way to hook a vac up to a sander you will be very happy.

    I hate the stuff too, but sometimes it just has to be done!

    I have a friend who is redoing a house, older by Fl standards, 1950's, it has plaster over lathe and the contractor refuses to use drywall on the areas that are being changed, he is bringing out a plasterer from retirement to do the work -- of course, big bucks

    enjoy the day(s) it will get done!

    Jay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    WNY, Buffalo Area
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    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Knoll View Post
    And you haven't begun to tape it yet! If you can find some way to hook a vac up to a sander you will be very happy.
    My Dad has a setup that you connect to your shop vac. It has a bucket in the line full of water. Basically the water traps most of the dust. I guess you could call it a 2 stage dry wall dust collector. Using this will help keep your vac filter from clogging with the dust. This set up uses a pole sander that the vac hose connects to. Insead of sandpaper it uses an abrasive screen to allow the dust removal. I have used it once and it worked fairly well. The bucket of sludge that was created wasn't too pleasant through.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  6. #6
    I am hoping that I will not have to mud this new addition. The wife does not want me to anyway, and I am not really great at it, noe is it something I want to do.

    I did some checking around and unfortunately, there is not much to choose from. My number one go to guy for drywall muddying (he did it for my uncle who is a contractor) said:

    "Yeah I can do that for you Travis. But I am a bit busy right now. The soonest I can get to it is next December. Can you wait till then?"

    Ahhhh, let me think about that for a moment. A growing baby in a one bedroom house...a project that has to be shut down for 6 months....NO!!

    So now I got to find out if this other guy can do it. He's an odd duck, is very good but quite particular. He has to have the entire house to himself. Nothing in any room, wide open spaces and he has to listen to country music. Myself that is almost the deal breaker. I would rather listen to static then listen to country music!! Still for a good muddying job, I might let him listen to that terrible whinning, moaning and general noise they call country music.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  7. #7
    Travis

    If you hire him, you're not going to be there if you abide by his "rules"

    And if you are, I'm sure you can put some hearing protection on.

    Someone once looked at my CD collection and said that I was a musical schizophrenic, so at times country music can be OK! Just tell him all you want to hear is Alan Jackson and Toby Keith and you want it LOUD! That and enough caffeine and you'll do fine. Beat him at his own game.

    Looking forward to some more progress pics!

    Jay

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I have no trouble cutting and mounting but I lack the "mud gene". Years after my first attempt I had to do some more drywall for a room addition. I did all the sheet work. I paid a 20 year old who did mud work all day long for a living. $100 and he was done in about an hour. Had all the tools and the ability. I would've messed around for 3 of 4 weekends trying to do as well.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    535
    Mudding isn't too bad if yer walls are straight, get yourself some 45 minute hot mud and go to it. Never leave a glob or ridge figuring you'll sand it off later. Put on several wide, thin, smooth coats, and give it a quick sand afterward. Or if you want, spray texture it, then you don't have to worry much about the smoothness.

    Still sucks to do a whole house or a big addition, got to just get in a groove and turn off the brain

    Not to be too pedantic, but its gypsum (alabaster), not limestone.
    Last edited by John Dow; 08-04-2007 at 07:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
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    1,407
    I'm the same as Glenn and Steve. I don't mind hanging it but I hate to finish it. I don't even mind the initial mudding but I absolutely hate to sand it. The dust gets all over, it dries your skin and just overall is a miserable job. When I have to do sheetrock work, I try to hire someone to do the finishing. But as I get older, I'd probably hire out all the work because the sheets are so heavy.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

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