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Thread: Shop Class Curriculum?

  1. #1

    Shop Class Curriculum?

    Hey, all! I figure with all the experience floating around this place, there's likely to be a few of you who could help me out!

    I was recently hired as the Shop/Industrial Arts teacher at a small private school, who really had no other options besides me (or they would have hired them instead!). Although I've worked in various shops over the years, I'm now faced with the job of coming up with classroom curriculum for students from 6th to 12th grade, with an average of 10 students in the shop at a time. Does anyone have books they'd recommend for my students--project books of various skill levels-- or books they'd recommend to me, as I learned most of what I know "unofficially", and feel grossly unprepared to teach proper usage and safety of the machines to fairly young students.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    ryan, one of my favorite texts is cabinetmaking and millwork by j.l feirer, it offers a basic understanding of materials, tools and the building process.
    shop drawing and or drafting are usefull courses, i was taught to draft by hand but kids today are probably much more comfortable using a `puter?
    kids are smart (by and large) show them the business end of a tool wether a chisel or a tablesaw and explain that if it`ll cut wood, flesh won`t even slow it down.....it`s their job as humans to retain as many of their digits as possible, the main reason folks get hurt or maimed using any tool is human error.....soooo, don`t make stupid errors.
    what type of courses besides woodworking are you to teach? electricity? metalworking-n-welding? autoshop-paint?
    Last edited by tod evans; 08-14-2007 at 11:03 AM. Reason: spellin`
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    No direct recommendations here but I had a woodwork teacher who used woodwork to teach other subjects as well. Relating geometry (3,4,5 rule as an example) into the real world can make a possibly dull subject like maths interesting to young people in new way. To me woodwork can be a tool to teach chemistry, physics, maths, biology - you name it.

    Good luck - work safe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,585
    Ryan, first, welcome to the family!

    Second, congrats on the new job!

    Teaching kids workshop is not small matter.

    A member here, Jim Hager just retired as a Woodshop teacher, PM him and maybe he could help you out with some suggestions, tell him Stu sent you!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Charlotte, NC
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    1,487
    Hey Ryan, good luck with the position! One of the first things you will probably want to cover is basic shop math! Don't have any specific recommendations!

    Welcome to the forum!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    Hi Ryan,
    Glad to have you. Somehow we can work through all this.
    Naturally, safety first, then focus on a purpose for the year, kinda like real general, then break the year in half and "How do I accomplish the foundation in the first half of the year that allows me to accomplish "MY PURPOSE" when the year is finally over.
    Good luck and stick with it here, there are teachers, educators, creative genius's, loving fathers and mothers and all can help you, as we all help each other.
    Shaz
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    I am a registered voter and you can be too. We ( registered voters ) select the moderators for this forum by voting every six months for the people we want to watch over this family forum.
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  7. #7
    Ryan

    Welcome to the forum!

    I just did a quick google, found this one example

    http://www.berkeleyhall.org/classroom/woodshop.html

    and there is a message board in the Woodcraft site for teachers

    Good luck, send us some pics of your class and their first projects

    Jay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    11,697
    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    ryan, one of my favorite texts is cabinetmaking and millwork by j.l feirer, it offers a basic understanding of materials, tools and the building process.
    shop drawing and or drafting are usefull courses, i was taught to draft by hand but kids today are probably much more comfortable using a `puter?
    kids are smart (by and large) show them the business end of a tool wether a chisel or a tablesaw and explain that if it`ll cut wood, flesh won`t even slow it down.....it`s their job as humans to retain as many of their digits as possible, the main reason folks get hurt or maimed using any tool is human error.....soooo, don`t make stupid errors.
    what type of courses besides woodworking are you to teach? electricity? metalworking-n-welding? autoshop-paint?
    If'n ye like it and learned some of what you do now from it, that's a good reccomendation. I just ordered a copy from B&N. Have a gift certificate from Father's Day from the son and grands I haven't used up yet. Can't think of a better use.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Ryan,

    Welcome to the Family!

    Woodshop was never offered in my school.
    I've never taken a woodworking class, but wished I would have. I learned from my Dad, books, TV shows (Norm-NYW & David Marks), just plain experimenting, and from the "Family" too!

    I did some digging around and found this link/course description for a woodworking class. It is pretty detailed, hope it helps.

    http://www.rcmahar.org/staff/jkelley...escription.htm
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  10. #10
    Todd is correct about cabinetmaking and millwork by J L Feirer being a good info text but in my experience with teaching for over 30 years, It is too dry, laced with minimum common informations and a bit too technical for the younger set. I used that book in the classroom for several years because there were no funds to replace them. The information had to be supported with a LOT of intervention by the teacher. (you had to explain it all and put it in terms they understand) But it is a good referance book. Earlier publications by J L Feirer and Bennet were excellant and much better, but they are old (woodworking never goes out of date) and the publisher have abandoned them. The drive towards Career orientation has driven the handwork skills out of the text books.

    My suggestion is to write to the publisher (Goodhart Wilcox comes to mind) and ask them for sample issues, they are often glad to supply a few copies for your review. At one time Goodhart had some excellant texts for general shop (heaven forbit you call it that now)

    I went to school half my life to become a teacher and it requires much more than a good text but that is a good start. Safety reviews and drawing & planning is one of the most import aspects of the class that many new teachers neglect till it is too late. Kids want to "Make something" I did too. but there needs to be preliminary learning prior to hands on. One way I approached this was through a small hands on project whilst we learned about the rest of the material. "Book Larnin' took place at the beginning and yet I set aside a Friday to do some "Hands-on" to reward the kids and adapt them to "shop" conditions and responsibilities. As we progressed then additiona days were set aside to do the "Work" until only a few days were consumed in technical Prep.

    I began my 6-7 graders with a simple project such as an ice scraper. They traced a pattern onto a scrap of 1/4' plexiglass, Used a Copiong saw and a "V" block to cut it out and the file the edges and sharpen the scraping edge. Sandpaper and steelwool to polish the edge, Why? A) consumes their desire to "Make something" B) Learn following directions and tool manipulation. C) tools not dangerous (yet) any injuries can be cured with a bandaid D) Plexiglass is a good teaching tool to explain how progressive grit sizes can work scratches down to a polished surface E) Plexiglass was scrap donated from local company F) Provided a useful project to take home and be proud.


    I run into "Old men" who approach me and say "I still got that ice scraper I made in your class in the 7th grade" I had a kid one time say "My Grandpa made an ice scraper just like this" That is when I knew it were time to retire....

    Good Luck, keep informed of how it goes.

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