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Thread: My take on turning the bottom off a Hollow Form

  1. #1
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    My take on turning the bottom off a Hollow Form

    OK, this is how I did it this time round, I've done this with a donut chuck as well, but this time, the hollow form was real thin like, so compressing it in the Donut chuck was not going to happen. I hope to get my Vacuum pump soon, then I'll be able to vacuum chuck it but, until then this is what I did.

    Attachment 11710
    I had a square piece of wood, that I'll eventually use for making a handle on something, but today, it worked as an extended "Jam Chuck".
    I turned it down so it will fit into the hollow form, and put a small radius on the end of it, so it was not too flat.

    Attachment 11711
    Next I cut a round foam pad and stuck it on the end of the piece. (using the tail stock to hold the piece while the glue dries).

    Attachment 11712
    I then slip the hollow form over the jamb chuck and........

    Attachment 11713
    .....bring up the tail stock.

    Attachment 11714
    I carefully cut the tenon away, and then sand, and finish it (at this point only sanding sealer).

    With only a little stub left, I cut that off with a sharp chisel, and then sand the bottom

    here is the nearly finished piece....

    Attachment 11715 Attachment 11716 Attachment 11717
    Six inches wide by about three inches tall, turned to about 1/6" most of the body, with the very bottom only turned to about 1/4". I've found the extra mass at the base makes these hollow forms sit better.
    The wood is Red Keyaki and this is the only hollow form I've done without a collar of some sort.

    The piece is sanded and finished inside too.

    The outside is sanded through #600, and finished with two coats of sanding sealer, I'll be rattle can lacquering this piece later.

    Well that is how I do it, if you can help me refine my technique or have something else to add, please do. If you have a question, I'll try to answer.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Nice idea Stu.

    I've also made a large jam chucks to hold pieces to aid in cleaning up the bottom.

    Later the jam chuck would be turned into a bowl.
    (I wish I could say this was my idea, but I read it somewhere)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Sardo View Post
    .........Later the jam chuck would be turned into a bowl. ..........
    Now that is what I call recycling!

    I'll keep that in mind for sure!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Nice, Stu! Jam chucks come in very handy in my shop. I have enough oak laying around that I usually just keep them as jam chucks. Never know when I might need another.

  5. #5
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    My wife says I am a pack rat Stu keeping all these small chunks of wood. I tell her they are jam chucks. I get this look. What's the problem???
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: That’s when you return from work one day
    and say, “Hi, Honey, I’m home – forever.”

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  6. #6
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    Stu, that is the traditional way of removing the tenon or chuck recess on the bottom of a bowl or hollow form.

    A friend of mine showed me another way that I like that is fast and so far works fine. I am sure there are shortcomings to it but it does seem to work

    Laminate a couple of pieces of MDF together and attach them to a faceplate. True up the MDF and glue some carpet padding to the face with rubber cement.

    Now you can just reverse your bowl or hollowform against the rubber on the large faceplate and bring up your live center to hold it. The rubber covered faceplate drives the piece without damaging it and the live center holds it in place and allows you to remove the majority of the wood you want to remove and finish the bottom except for the nub left after you remove it.

    Here is a picture of it in use....
    I may be getting a little older physically but mentally I'm still tarp as a shack.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Mike, I'll add that one to my list of things to make!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Hi Stu,

    Another approach is to glue a block onto your dougnut chuck and turn it into a cone shape. It won`t interfere with you regular bowls, so you get two for the price of one.

    Gari

    P.S. I`m been vacationing in Japan for the past four weeks. Another four before I head back to Vancouver. I`m getting cold turkey from the lack of turning!

  9. #9
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    If I don't use the donut, my approach is usually about like Big Mike's. I just mount the back plate part of my donut chuck (3/4" ply on a faceplate) and use pressure from the tailstock to sandwich a piece of closed cell foam between the plate and the turned piece. The foam's not glued to the backing plate, but I've used successfully this for both hollow forms and bowls.

    If it's a hollow form with much of a collar, I'll also sandwich one of the smaller rings from my donut chuck between the piece the the backing plate. This way the tailstock pressure is on the shoulders of the vessel, not the collar. Here again, just friction, no adhesives.

    Attachment 11766

    I intend to turn myself a cone so I can try out Gari's suggestion, too.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
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    Oct 2006
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    Hey Gari, if you are in or around Tokyo, drop by the Dungeon, and I'll let you take a spin on the DVR!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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