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Thread: A Bad Penny

  1. #1
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    Nov 2006
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    A Bad Penny

    Just like a bad penny, I'm back. Did everyone behave themselves?
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Sacramento, CA
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    1,325
    You were gone?

    I MISSED YOU DAVE!!

    Welcome back! Now where's my "How to make anything and everything with any material of any size with any dimensions and any number of moving parts" SketchUp drawing? hmmm?
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
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    Well, thanks Jason.

    Bring it on. I think I still remember how to work SketchUp.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  4. #4
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    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Good to see you back, Dave.

    Tod did a great job of handling all the SketchUp questions that came along in your absence. He referred them all to Roscoe. Roscoe didn't have the answers, but nobody seemed to want to argue with him.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Thanks Vaughn. My gratitude to Roscoe for taking care of things. Maybe I should go on vacation again.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Clardy View Post
    Everyone behaved well...........

    Except tod.
    Just upset because Roscoe took over his "job"?
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  7. #7
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    i don`t kid anybody.......roscoe`s the brains behind this operation!
    glad you`re back dave.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  8. #8
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    Glad you made it back Dave. So how about going out for some lobster?

    So let's hear about the trip. Did you make it to see TL-N?

    I already reported on your stop over on your way to lobster land.

    Karl

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    Hey Dave, great to see you back, hope you had a great, relaxing time!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Hey gang, thanks for the welcome back. I had a great time starting with the visit with Karl. That guy can cook! And bake, too. His soup is excellent as are his cookies. He's just a plain old nice guy, too.

    Maine was great. I ate a lobster for Karl out there so I didn't get to eat as many for myself as I wanted to but who's complaining? The weather was a bit warmer than forecast but that just made it nice to be out by or on the water.

    We made a pilgrimage to the boat building capital of the world, Brooklin, Maine. The timing was excellent because there was a group of 40 small boats getting ready for the Small Reach Regatta sponsored by WoodenBoat. They sailed and rowed on Eggemoggin Reach for a couple of days.

    We didn't get to L-N but instead opted to go for a lobster lunch sail on the schooner Heron, a 52' wooden boat. I think this boat would be interesting to any woodworker for some of the construction methods employed. Although it is a traditional boat built to a design drawn by John Alden in the 20s, it was built using some modern approaches. The frames are laminated instead of sawn and they are joined to the keel with tapered sliding dovetails. The sliding dovetails are definitely out of the ordinary. The deck beams were also attached with sliding dovetails. The rolling bevels on the planking were cut using a tilting head shaper with one man feeding the work and the other adjusting the tilt of the head on the fly. Typically this work would be done by offering the plank up to the boat, checking for gaps, removing the plank, handplaning a bit on the bevel and then heading back to the boat. Using the shaper allowed the work to proceed much more rapidly.

    Here's a picture I found showing the dovetailed white oak frames into the keel.


    Meeting Karl was the first highlight of the trip. Perhaps the second was meeting some friends I made last fall and winter who live in West Boothbay Harbor when I did some work related to a dock proposal they were fighting. (story's too long to go into but it did involve using SketchUp. )They are very nice folks and we had a great time. One of them gave us quite the tour of the harbor and part of the Sheepscot River area. After that we had a lobster dinner with lobsters from the neighboring lobsterman. Yum!

    Anyway, enough babbling. I'm still working on getting the photos together and I'll post a few when I get finished.

    Oh, another place we stopped was Captain Tinkham's Emporium in searsport. If you're looking for old tools, that's the place to go. Check out this link: http://www.jonesport-wood.com/jwcaptain/jwctetour1.htm
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

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