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Thread: Did good or overkill?

  1. #1

    Did good or overkill?

    Recently I did some trim work on my house, and while there were other ways to do it, I ended up using a splice in the wood. Now for a second I pondered something. The trim I was putting up would face years of Maine weather, so should I use the good ole Franklin wood glue or something more weather resistant. In the end I chose a 3M product that bonds wood to wood, wood to fiberglass, or fiberglass to wood. It is a bonding/ sealant agent used in the Marine industry for through-hull fittings.

    My question is simple. Would the Franklin Woodworkers Glue II been alright in this application, or did I do good by using something better.

    The reason I ask is, the 3m product stuff is 16 dollars a tube and very sticky, messy stuff to work with. The regular woodworkers glue is cheap and easy to deal with. I have more trim to put up so I am curious as to which I should use.

    On a side note, I also used flashing behind my windows that will go under the siding. Once again I had to ponder whether I should use galvanized sheet metal, aluminum flashing or copper. Once again I decided I was going for the long term here and used copper flashing, soldered at the joints. In this application is one type of metal better than the others, or was the copper once again overkill?

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    travis, so long as you allow water to get out of the wall cavity the 3-m stuff is overkill but as you said you won`t have to worry about it...copper is great flashing material but it does have galvonic reactions to some woods and to other metals so make sure that the application in which you`ve used it is appropriate. the biggest thing i worry about when caulking or applying flashing is making sure where you`re directing the water...unless you completely plasticoat your house water will get into the wall cavitys and a smart person designs to allow the walls to breathe.....the water infiltration can be from an exterior source or in the form of condensation where warmer heated air and cold air meet......use common sense
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    3m 5200 caulking? Never used it but heard it is a bear to remove. Should seal that jointer tight! And that is where I see a lot of rot in trim on the homes I inspect. the Joints.

    Copper if probably overkill but it will outlast you. (Assuming you put it in right) And there is something to said for that.

    I ticked my contractor off when building my house. There were some area's I refused to back down on how I wanted it built because I knew what would happen. I had seen it be a problem down the road. He built them and left and didn't have to deal with it. So I like overkill as long as it doesn't break the budget.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


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  4. #4
    I worry about allowing my new addition to breath to be honest with you. Its very tight, from the Grace Ice and Watershield on the roof, a new special tar paper under the shingles, the new typar products used under the cedar shingles....this house is wrapped quite tight.

    I do have some darn good vents in this house though, so I am hoping the attic ventilation will help. Its kind of funny because I live on a pretty good sized hill and the wind blows hard up here. Its not uncommon to hear empty cardboard boxes in the attic tumbling across the attic space in a good wind. Hopefully that moving air will help keep the attic cool in the summer and winter.

    As for the flashing, I had some issues with a window with the old siding. Apparently water was running down a window side and then under the siding. When I ripped off the siding to put on the new addition I saw that water had rotted out the sheathing, and two studs about halfway in. I since have replaced those studs and renewed the sheathing and even reinsulated the cavity (water pipes inside this wall so no taking a chance there) so I am gun shy about water infiltrating my windows again.

    I am still undecided about coppering the rest of my window flashing. The one window I flashed extremely well because its in the corner of my house. Its a terrible place for a window, but I did not want to lose this only window in a small bathroom. Its really bad because its at the base of a roof valley that will get a lot of water run off. I was concerned with water coming off the valley, being broadsided by the wind up here (North wall on a big hill facing the North) and then being wind-driven into crevices and gaps. In this case, water really does run up hill. Hence so much copper flashing.

    Last edited by Travis Johnson; 08-31-2007 at 05:05 PM.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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