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Thread: Panel Thickness on Cab Doors

  1. #1
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    Panel Thickness on Cab Doors

    I just bought 3 sets of Rail & Stile router sets. How thick are panel doors generally? Naturally, a raised panel will be thicker and then flare down to the edge. So how thick is that edge that is mortised all the way around?

    Gary Curtis

  2. #2
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    gary, shoot for flat doors at 3/4" ......they can vary 1/16th either way.....by flat i mean back cut your panels, don`t raise `em on only one side......makes sanding easier..
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    that works too steve......so long as gary has the ability to thickness panels?
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    It dawned on me after I posted this question that I should just look at the R&S cutters to check the size of the slot for the panels. So I did. Two of them have a 1/4" slot cutter stacked under the Cope cutter. So on these two I'll be shooting for a mortise in the rail and stile of 1/4".

    The 3rd R&S cutter (eBay wonder) is made for a glass with a bead. The slot it makes is 1/8". I was hoping to use it at times withouta solid panel because it has an ogive pattern. So, I guess it is OK to 'back-cut' my panels down to 1/8" on the edges. Does that seem practical?

  5. #5
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    I've used raise panel sets from CMT or Sommerfeld to make raised paneled doors. They have matching rail, stile, & panel sets with a backcutter on the panel bit so it is cut at the same time as profile. Machining all parts good face down will flush front of panel when assembled. www.sommerfeldtools.com. sommerfeld also has dvds showing how to make raised panel doors or glass panel doors.
    James

  6. #6
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    I use 1/4" panels for shop cabinets, 3/4" for raised panels. I prefer the back cut as it leaves the panel flush with the R&S. Some folks don't back cut as they want the proud panel look; I'm not much on this myself. 1/8" wood seems too weak for me if supporting a 3/4" panel. I've also seen 5/8" or 1/2" panels without the back cut to achieve flush or 'just' proud looks.

    No rules. It depends what the look is that you want. Do leave your solid wood panels smaller than the opening though so that they float. This allows for wood movement (space balls, foam or tubing to stop rattle). I glue in my plywood panels at a few locations but not along the whole length (the R&S need to move too). The exception is ply or hardboard panels in ply or MDF R&S. That's just me, YMMV.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  7. #7
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    The dimension I was asking about are the 4 edges of the panel. On this glass panel R & S set I bought, the groove to take the edge will be only 1/8th inch.

    That may be fine when actually fitting glass into the door. But since this is the only Ogive pattern cutter I'll have, I was curious as to weather a wood panel ---- raised, plywood, flat -- would be secure when held by 1/8th.

    Gary

  8. #8
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    gary, i wouldn't think 1/8 is enough to support the panel, remember, after the door is built it might seem strong, but if this is going on kitchen or bath cabinets, try to imagine how many times that door will be shut and place stress on the edge of that panel. just something to think about.

    chris

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Lord View Post
    I've used raise panel sets from CMT or Sommerfeld to make raised paneled doors. They have matching rail, stile, & panel sets with a backcutter on the panel bit so it is cut at the same time as profile. Machining all parts good face down will flush front of panel when assembled. www.sommerfeldtools.com. sommerfeld also has dvds showing how to make raised panel doors or glass panel doors.
    James
    Hi James,
    Thanks for the input. I like that idea for the one pass machining. Nice to have you getting involved. Look forward to more of your sharing!
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  10. #10
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    normally for 3/4in panels, I go with a little under 1/4in. I haven't done any back cutting/rabbeting the back of the panel. I kind of like the look of the raised panel protruding just a bit beyond the rails and stiles. Although this makes sanding a little more difficult.

    I haven't done any doors with glass panes, however, I know that it is common to trim out the back of the rails & stiles as to make a rabbet in the back of the door frame (instead of the 1/4in groove). The reason behind this is to allow for glass replacement. If you set the pane of glass in the grove, glue up the rails and stiles, and the glass gets broken.... you'll have a good bit of work in store to replace the glass.

    If you use thin strips of wood tacked in to hold the glass in place, it is more repairable, if necessary.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
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