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Thread: Cutting coves on Table saw/RAS

  1. #1
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    Cutting coves on Table saw/RAS

    Need to make some molding for the wine cabinet. I don't have anything in my shaper tooling that I like for this. I was thinking of starting with a crown cut on the Table saw then going from there and doing something additional on the shaper.

    I have seen this done on the table saw. I have never done it but doesn't look hard. Then I got to thinking why couldn't I do that on the RAS? Just turn the arm to 30 degrees instead of setting up fence(s) on the table saw.
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  2. #2
    Called core box cut. Simply make a diagonal fence and slide the piece at an angle across the saw blade, taking deeper cuts with each slice. Look up the directions as I are not stable of mind enough to go into detail. Look for core box cut... Google search

  3. #3
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    I've seen that done on a tablesaw also. It may not be but it sure seems to me that it would be hard on the blade and maybe something inside the saw. I realize that you just take small bites at a time but I still don't like the idea and I am fearless.

  4. #4
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    I think I'd rather do it on a TS than a RAS. It's surprisingly easy...just use good pushing tools and featherboards. Here are a couple small examples...

    This one originally had 3/4" thick straight sides, but it looked too clunky, so I trimmed some thickness off the box before cutting the coves (on the assembled box). It was an experiment gone right. I used the offcuts to make the top.



    This one I started with thinner stock, and I also assembled the box before cutting the coves, but also ran some straight materials through at the same time, out of which I made the top.





    So...if a hack like me can do it, I'm sure you can, too. It does make a lot of sawdust, and you'll have to do some finish sanding, but it's worked well for me.

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  5. #5
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    jeff, i wouldn`t try cutting a cove on the radial arm saw....the reason for doing it on the tablesaw is that only "x" amount of blade can contact your work if something goes wonky.....with the radial arm there`s a possibility for things to get real hairy quickly.....i would use the table saw.
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  6. #6
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    to add to tod's comment, how would you push it through the ras at the end?

    the table saw method at least keeps the blade under the board.

  7. #7
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    To get to the final width and depth of cut in the arc itself, make a four sided stick rectangle with a pin nail to join them, say 20" X 10" then decide how deep you want the final depth of cut to be and raised the blade that high, then figure the width of your arc in your finished piece and squeeze your stick rectangle into a parallelogram to that width. now set it on ove the ts blade and adjust the angle to touch the blade coming up and the blade going down through the table bed. Machine has been off of course. That will give you the angle and the position of the stationary fence you will need to clamp. Lower the blade and just take a little at a time.
    Good luck.
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  8. #8
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    To do this safely on a RAS you want to remember to have the blade angles set up so that you are feeding against the blade, similar to ripping on a RAS.

    For the final feeding on a RAS you use a push stick, just like is recommended for many TS cuts. I've played with this type of cut on my RAS and what I did for a puch stick is that I bolted a square of 3/4" particle board to one of those rubber bottomed push grips used primarily for jointing.

    Also, remember to record the angles you used for the miter and bevel adjustment (and blade size for that matter - I used the two outer blades of my 8" dado set without chippers) so that the cove can be replicated later if needed.
    Last edited by Mark Kosmowski; 09-17-2007 at 03:03 PM.

  9. #9
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    I've done this on my TS a number of times. Very easy once you understand the setup. But would I do it on a RAS? Not on your life. JMO

  10. #10
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    Here's some links for an online cove cut calculator:

    http://dknudson.unixcab.org/covecut.html

    There's also a little piece of free software floating around the 'net called Cove Cutter 1.0. It's one of the downloads listed on this page:

    http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticle...html#downloads

    In my limited experience, I've found the calculators get you close, but I still end up testing with scrap and tweaking the setup to get the desired results.
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