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Thread: Lock joint bit

  1. #1
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    Mar 2007
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    Lock joint bit

    just picked up a 45 degree lock joint bit, pretty formadable looking. anybody have any luck with them ? any do's or don'ts? thanks Thanks Gerry

  2. #2
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    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
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    Last edited by glenn bradley; 09-25-2007 at 03:19 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
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    one of my very favorite cutters. haven't done it on a router table in a long, long time, but i do it on the shaper every chance I get. does take some practice and patience in the beginning. i'll be posting a flats project soon where the lock miter was integral.
    Mini Max Tool Acquisition Mediator.
    "An old man to most kids and a young man to those who are dead."

    www.samantics2.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    The key to success, in my opinion, is
    1. For a given setup, all the boards must be identical thickness
    2. First set the height. When you flip one of two test boards over, they will join perfectly if the height is right.
    3. Second, set the fence (for the part that must be aligned against the fence). No matter how great the temptation, don't change the height while you are adjusting the fence. If the height needed changing, you wouldn't have gotten past the previous step.
    4. If you have instructions from an old issue of Fine Woodworking, don't believe it. There was an error in an often-referenced article, that suggested one side of a leg/box/whatever should be done flat, the other against the fence. The better way is both sides against the fence (for two of the four sides) and both sides against the table (for the other two sides)
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alpharetta GA ( Metro Atlanta)
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    Charlie,

    Thanks for your answers. I have read a lot of thread about this bit that were negative. To me it seems like a great bit and I would like to try it someday, so.

    I guess I would need to do this to understand, but I don't get # 4....

    I'm sure your are correct because 1 - 3 make so much sense, but I am not visualizing # 4.

    Thanks...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bartee Lamar View Post
    Charlie,

    I'm sure your are correct because 1 - 3 make so much sense, but I am not visualizing # 4.

    Thanks...
    I don't want to speak for Charlie (but I will talk about him if you want to hear some good stories - Just kidding.) I think what he means is to cut the two opposing sides the same. For instance, sides 1 and 3 will oppose each other, so cut them both (all four edges) on the table, and then all four edges of sides 2 and 4 on the fence. This makes for a very simplified glue up. I also don't like to set things so that I get a knife sharp edge, which can have a tendency to chip, fray, or worse, cut you. I like to set things so the edge is blunted about 1/64", or there abouts. I also plan on planing the post after glue to my desired dimension (I feel this is easier than trying to get it perfect right from glue up) then the tiny flats I left disappear, leaving what looks like a solid post.

    Hope this doesn't confuse the issue.
    Mini Max Tool Acquisition Mediator.
    "An old man to most kids and a young man to those who are dead."

    www.samantics2.com

  7. #7
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    Matt, Great article/post provided. Thanks, learned a lot as well as I now know exactly how I can use one in more than one situation and how badly it is needed!!!

  8. Quote Originally Posted by Bartee Lamar View Post
    Charlie,

    I'm sure your are correct because 1 - 3 make so much sense, but I am not visualizing # 4.

    Thanks...
    I believe Charlie is saying that instead of producing a "male" on one edge and a "female" on the other for each piece, you can produce two pieces that have both "males" and two that have both "females".

  9. #9
    Can this bit be used on plywood?

    I am planning a 'cupboard' for under my workbench. This looks like it could be useful to make the carcass.


    Ian.

  10. #10
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    Hey Gerry,
    I really like those bits. Way faster than dovetails. I built some dressers about 15 years ago with miter lock bits. The dressers take a lot of abuse but all the joints have held up perfectly!

    My advice is to mill plenty of scrap and make a test box in scrap first. Once you get the hang of it, its easy, but hard to visualize that first time.
    Don't believe everything you think!

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