Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Pushing wood when face jointing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    417

    Pushing wood when face jointing

    I had a wide piece of wood I was face jointing this evening, and after a couple of passes and it starting to get flat I had a really hard time pushing it through. It seemed as though it was being sucked down when it got to the outfeed side, and I moved my pressure to that side.

    I was using a pair of Grr-rippers to push it through using the hand over hand method on the outfeed side, which I had to apply a quite a bit of down force to get it to move. Could it just be the weight of the wood, its about 12" wide and about 7 feet long, about 7/8" thick when I started.

    Any special push stick or something I could try to make pushing it through easier or is that just the way it is with wood that wide?

    Thaks
    Rise above the rest

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    535
    I've generally only had that problem when the blades were really dull, like, ummm, now seems like I never change them often enough. Try a touch test on the blades (jointer off, naturally) comparing the center with the ends of the blades.

    Only other suggestion I've got is give the beds a nice waxing, that helps more than you might think.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    Try it with the jointer off. I'm going with "wax that bed and fence".
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
    I am not proud of those Icky Plastic rubber footed Pushers, seem too Dainty for my pleasures... I have always made Push block which were a flat board to which a handle was attached (similar to a concrete Trowel) and a cleat was glued into a dado across the bottom rear.

    Of late I have fashioned a push block in the same manner and used a piece of old Mouse Pad as a rubber pad under the pusher. I do use the Plastic gismos as a hold down with my lead hand (years ago I used my hand only) Then I was in a discount tool store and spyed a Grout float which is a large version of those cheap plastic pushers. alluminum plate with a spungy rubber face and a massive handle that can handle the load. I use it for the front hold down but still use the wood pusher with a cleat to push from the rear. (wish I had pictures but.....?)

    I remember a bunch of decades ago when I had a student use his thumb to push a board across the joiner, before I could get to him he did the deed and removed 1/16" of his thumb tip. (Wasn't he lucky I had just replace those blades with nice sharp ones?) Whew!!! Was I ever ready to call the nurse, but a band aid and a good lesson learned...Wonder if he has a flat thumb to this day? Ever see a young man faint? They fall hard like a wet limp rag.

    Waxed bed will help as well. Also, if the board is cupped, often a suction cup effect takes place when you begin to flatten the underside, Somebody makes a dry lube that is good for making the table seem slimmy. But a good coat of Paste wax should help.
    Last edited by Bill Simpson; 10-09-2007 at 02:54 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Smithville, TX
    Posts
    358
    As the board becomes flatter, more wood is contacting the table, hence more resistance is met, even on a well waxed table. Let the knives do the work, don't offer any downward force at all and push the board with a push stick, like you would when ripping on a table saw. I go counter to the way most folks operate a jointer and I never end up on the outfeed table. My boards end up quite flat with less effort. I will post a project tonight in the flatwork section where you can see how I push through on the jointer with my handy jointer pusher.
    Mini Max Tool Acquisition Mediator.
    "An old man to most kids and a young man to those who are dead."

    www.samantics2.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    417
    Thanks Sam, I thought I was told or read somewhere that you were supposed to start applying pressure on the outfeed side once it had 6-12" of material on it. That is why I was doing that, but I will switch when I start doing my next piece and see how that goes.

    Thanks for all the tips guys.
    Rise above the rest

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Beaver View Post
    Thanks Sam, I thought I was told or read somewhere that you were supposed to start applying pressure on the outfeed side once it had 6-12" of material on it. That is why I was doing that, but I will switch when I start doing my next piece and see how that goes.

    Thanks for all the tips guys.

    This is how we were taught back in the dark ages. And I follow through with that system w/o any problems and My flats are great. Positive pressure on the outfeed maintains a single plane (level surface) and keeps from creating a rocker effect. The outfeed table is a stationary surface exactly the height of the cutters so it stands to reason that if you maintain surface contact with the outfeed then the result will be an even surface. I would not suggest letting a piece ride across on its own acord being held by a stick.

    If you are sticking to the table then it is from the less than ideal pushers that is requireing too much down pressure to control forward motion. Get thyself a pusher with a cleat that will firmly grip the wood and push with less effort, use the plastic toys they sell to guide the leading edge and hold it down to the outfeed whilst a real pusher controls the feed.

    Sorry Sam but I can't agree with your method. But if it works for you and you are happy then by all means continue and enjoy the pleasures of your work.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
    Posts
    1,813
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post

    If you are sticking to the table then it is from the less than ideal pushers that is requireing too much down pressure to control forward motion. Get thyself a pusher with a cleat that will firmly grip the wood and push with less effort, use the plastic toys they sell to guide the leading edge and hold it down to the outfeed whilst a real pusher controls the feed.
    The cleat works well Bill, (in most cases), but in Aaron's case, the cleat may not be the answer, Unless he's got arms that are a lot longer than mine, since the wood he is pushing through is 7' long.
    Last edited by Stuart Ablett; 10-10-2007 at 06:18 AM. Reason: Fixed a "QUOTE" Tag

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Got to ask Aaron, when was the last time you checked your jointer for flatness and for the two tables being coplanar?

    Mine was out just a touch, when I finally broke down and bought a decent straight edge, I figured this out

    Now that my two tables are coplanar, I can do what Sam says, well I would, but I'm not that brave I still keep one hand on the push pad on the outfeed table, but I'm putting very little pressure on it at all, more of a steering motion, to keep things going straight.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stockport, England
    Posts
    161
    Is there a particular reason why you are face jointing a piece of wood 7ft long?

    Unless you need that length for your project you will find it a lot easier to cut your pieces slightly over the length you actually need before face jointing. The same goes for edge jointing.

    In furniture making I don't often need stock over 4ft in length and so rarely need to joint a full length, about the only exception being the face frames and door stiles of full height wardrobes.

    Anybody ever tried a power feed on a jointer when face jointing?

    Just a thought...

Similar Threads

  1. Need to do some edge jointing
    By Chris Hatfield in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-15-2010, 10:20 AM
  2. Face to Face Glue-ups Without Sliding
    By glenn bradley in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-04-2009, 05:45 PM
  3. Long finger jointing
    By Jeff Horton in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-16-2006, 01:06 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •