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Thread: I hate willow

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    New Springfield OH
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    806

    I hate willow

    My brother calls me up last night, says bring the big saw (075 stihl) tomorrow, got a big tree to take down.
    So off I went this morning, over to big brothers, Had breakfast (farm fresh eggs, buckwheat cakes, fresh smoked bacon and sausage, lots of coffee and fresh whole raw milk)
    Get that out of the way and off we go to see a member of his church. Thats when I found out it was a willow tree I knew I should have asked. The trunk was only about 8 feet high, before it branched out in a gazillion different directions. But it was also about 5 feet in diameter. Stupid thing had branches on it where big enough that the big saw wouldn't have cut in one pass straight down through. Getting the branches lopped off was a pain, never knew just quite when they where going to fall. Then it took me almost an hour to whittle the butt off. wet, stinky and nasty.

    I know one thing, after man handling that 075 all day I am definitely buying a Husky 372XP one way or another. That Stihl will where you out

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    Yep, willow is not much good for anything, except sucking up water if you got soggy land.
    ............what........... no pictures...........

    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    May 2007
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    Stockport, England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    Yep, willow is not much good for anything:
    ...except cricket bats!

    (awaits dumb yank question!)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Cheslett View Post
    ...except cricket bats!

    (awaits dumb yank question!)
    I'd have thought Ash or Beech for Cricket Bats...
    -Ned

  5. #5
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    Well this Canuck knows what a Cricket bat is, I played that in High School, fun learning to catch that HARD ball barehanded when someone really nails one
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    I'd have thought Ash or Beech for Cricket Bats...
    I would have thought the same thing....isn't willow kinda soft? Or maybe willow bends and acts like a "springboard" when contact is made with the ball?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  7. #7
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    I knew they were willow and I knew they were hard and lightweight. I remember when we got new bats each year, we would spend hours pounding the darn things with the ball, to season them or some such thing. The Coach told us it made the bats better, compressing the fiber or some such thing, all I know is it was not a fun task to have to do.

    I just checked, the willow they use for Cricket bats is not the same as our "Weeping Willow"........

    • The Cricket-bat Willow (Salix alba 'Caerulea'), often referred to simply as English Willow, is grown as a specialist timber crop in Britain, mainly for the production of cricket bats, but also for other uses where a tough, lightweight wood that does not splinter easily, is required. It is distinguished mainly by its growth form, very fast growing with a single straight stem, and also by its slightly larger leaves (10-11 cm long, 1.5-2 cm wide) with a more blue-green colour. Its origin is unknown, but it may be a hybrid between White Willow and Crack Willow (Salix fragilis).
    • The Weeping Willow (Salix sepulcralis 'Chrysocoma', syn. Salix 'Tristis') is a hybrid between White Willow and Peking Willow (Salix babylonica, syn. Salix matsudana).
    Also found this

    Growing Willow for Cricket Bats

    Interesting!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stockport, England
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    That's great, Stu.

    Years ago I visited a cricket bat factory in India while on holiday there. The willow came from England to be made into bats before being shipped back again.

    The interesting bit is the handle. It's made from a length of rattan cane split into 3 or 4 pieces and fastened back together with a slither of rubber (old bike inner tubes) between each piece.

    There is a lot of old rubbish talked about the correct stance and technique to be used when wielding a cricket bat. We had an American lad in our class at school and he simply adopted a baseball player's stance. He was fantastic! They wouldn't put him in the school team though, as his way of playing was considered 'bad form'!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    I'd have thought Ash or Beech for Cricket Bats...
    I just picked up a cricket bat-sized piece of beech in my workshop and... ...no - it's about three times too heavy!

    As Stu says, English Willow is very light, hard, and also flexible, making it perfect for a bat. Or as a weapon of self-defence. Or offence!

    By the way, what are baseball bats made of?

  10. #10
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    I turned one out of ash for my BIL about a year ago, (wasn't real pretty or functional), after seeing one on a website somewhere...I think that's what most are made out of?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


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