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Thread: Free Faceplates!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807

    Free Faceplates!!

    .......OK, not quite "Free" but dirt cheap for sure........

    I bought the Beall wood threading tap, sized for my Nova DVR 3000 lathe, that would be 1 1/4" 8 TPI.

    I'll show you how it works.......

    Click image for larger version. 

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    OK here is the basic set up, I have;
    A block of wood, (dense hardwood, side grain is the best)
    A chuck and jaws that will hold said block of wood
    A 14mm box end wrench
    A Dill bit sized for the tap you have for your lathe
    A wood tap, sized for your lathe
    A dill chuck with a MT#2 on it to go into the tail stock
    A lathe, and some Pam cooking spray

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You start by putting the wooden block in the chuck, and the drill chuck in the tailstock and the drill bit, in the drill chuck

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The you drill the hole, with the lathe on a fairly slow speed, I find that about 400 rpm just right.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Make sure you clean the hole out well, then you remove the drill chuck and bit from the tail stock, and get the wood tap and the 14mm box end wrench.
    I put the box end of the wrench on the square part of the tap, with the wrench on there so the wrench angles towards the headstock, not the tail stock.

    From this point on the lathe is used UNPOWERED until the tapping is finished!


    Click image for larger version. 

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    You can see the wrench here contacting the banjo, this holds the wrench from turning, which, is like having a third hand. BTW, Beall does recommends to do things slightly differently, they use the open end, which works, but I find this way, I can concentrate on keeping the tap going into the wood more consistently. (the RED arrow show the wrench contacting the banjo)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    OK, now you move up the tail stock, without anything in the MT hole, the end of the tap goes in there. Move the tail stock so the end of the tap goes in the hole of the MT and the tap goes in the hole you just drilled, with the wrench contacting the banjo, you are now free to turn the spindle of the lathe with one hand and the tail stock with the other hand. You can see the knock out bar I put in the handle on the spindle side, this makes it a lot easier to turn. The tail stock is turned to apply only slight pressure on the tap, once the tap starts to dig in, it pulls itself into the wood.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A shot of Pam cooking spray makes this even easier

    Click image for larger version. 

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    When the tap bottoms out, stop turning, if you keep going, you can split the block of wood.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Pull the tailstock out of the way, and lock the spindle on your lathe, then using the wrench, back the tap out of the hole

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You should have some nice threads in your hole now.........

    Cont..........
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Part II

    Now you need to face off the block and do a little cutting.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    First, I need a little bump or ridge on the block, as my lathe has a flush bearing right behind the spindle, so I need this bump as a spacer.
    mine needs to be 44mm, I mark it with my dividers, which are set to 44mm, making sure to touch only the left leg of the dividers.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I turn the face off, leaving this little ridge, or spacer, I also turn the threads off on the inside just a touch.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A close up.
    Your lathe might be different, figure it out, what can and what cannot make contact when the block is screwed on all the way.

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    This is how the spindle of my DVR 3000 looks

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    Here the block is screwed into place, you can see the space that the bump or ridge provides, without it, the block would rub on the face of the headstock........... not good....

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Now it is just a simple matter to turn the blocks nice and round and flat on the face, I'll use these two for jam chucks or some such thing, having a couple around is really convenient.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I make them into face plates of a sort, and then use them to mount my Donut chucks or my leather faced power strop.

    Well, I hope this was of some interest to some one, the $27 or so the tap costs, plus the drill bit, (if you don't have one in the right size) is a good investment, as you can make a lot of fixtures for you lathe that just bolt right on.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Zushi, Japan
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    739
    Stu that is quite the coincidence. I am just putting an order in now and on it is the same item.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Good for you, I think you will like it!

    I did make one mistake in these last two blocks, stupid simple thing......... can anyone spot it
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Zushi, Japan
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    Can't see it Stu.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
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    Stu when you thread a piece wood they can also make super nice glue blocks. When I thread a glue block I can usually use it a dozen times by then it is gettng thin then scrap it and make another. Nice pic's Stu.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: That’s when you return from work one day
    and say, “Hi, Honey, I’m home – forever.”

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
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    5,719
    Wow, $18 for something that can save me $100's in the long run....I think I need one of those. My dad uses a tap he got from a auto parts store, more expensive and he said it is harder to use. thanks Stu.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Reid View Post
    Can't see it Stu.
    I know, I made two of them, and only saw my mistake when I was writing this thread

    I used "Endgrain" you are supposed to use side or face grain

    Oh well, they will work for Glue blocks, like Bernie says.

    Jeff, in some ways, they are better than faceplates, one thing is, if you get too close to one, you don't dull your gouge on it

    if find them real useful and I make up six or so at one time, easier that way.

    Yes the one for cutting wood does work better than the metal working one, and it was a LOT cheaper than the metal working one too!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    618
    Thanks, Stu
    This is a great idea.
    I can't wait to try it so I can tell all my friends it was my idea.

    Okay, just kidding!

    .....Gord

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
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    A friend of mine who is a machinist has made a couple things for my shop - this is steel, YMMV for wood - and he will have the tap chucked in the tailstock, turn the lathe on and then off and make first contact with the workpiece while moving without power. He explained that a moving bit will wobble into a stationary workpiece, but that a moving workpiece will cause a stationary bit to self-center.

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