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Thread: Finishing Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
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    618

    Finishing Question

    Okay, how do you guys get such amazing finishes on some of your work? I'm fairly pleased with the pens that I'm making but not with the finishes I've put on them. Some of the pieces I've seen here are so glossy they almost look like plastic. I'd like to achieve that kind of finish if possible.

    I'm sanding to 1200 grit, then using EEE Ultashine and, finally, Shellawax Cream. A nice, smooth finish but I'd like them to be far glossier than they are. I've been told to try a few coats of high gloss laquer. Can I use the EEE Ultrashine before the laquer or will that keep the laquer from adhering to the wood? Should I use the Shellawax Cream after the laquer or would that be a waste of time and Cream? Sorry if this seems basic but I don't want to waste the wood experimenting if one of you experts can show me the way.

    I hope this question is in the right forum.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
    .....Gord
    Last edited by Gord Rock; 10-19-2007 at 03:35 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    gord, sand with the grain to 120-150 grit....then apply gloss lacquer, 3-15 coats lightly sanding between coats.....buff-polish-wax to your hearts content..
    the reason for 120-150 on bare wood is so the finish will adhere...sucessive coats of finish build depth and polishing brings the sheen you want.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    gord, sand with the grain to 120-150 grit....then apply gloss lacquer, 3-15 coats lightly sanding between coats.....buff-polish-wax to your hearts content..
    the reason for 120-150 on bare wood is so the finish will adhere...sucessive coats of finish build depth and polishing brings the sheen you want.
    Thanks, Tod
    I'll give it a try.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    I'll agree with Tod on that for sure.

    On some very hard dense woods, you might want to sand to say #320, but at #220, it where I apply the lacquer sanding sealer, I find that if I do this, and then sand to #320, I get a nice smooth surface, ready for the rattle can lacquer. Next thing for turnings is the Beall buffing system, the two compounds and then Carnuba wax just make that lacquer so nice, but word to the wise, try this on some ordinary pieces first, so you get the hang of it, not too fast, not too much compound either, take a bit of practice, but boy does it work well.

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
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    Stu and Tod gave you some good advice. I agree with both. I sand to 220 and don't hardly ever go higher. I use the rattle can lacquer that Stu talks about either in gloss or satin but I don't sand inbetween. I use synthetic pads to get most of the imperfections out. My preference is satin. After most generally 5 to 9 coats I then beall buff thru tripoli, white diamond and then I do something a little different. I use clear shoe polish, let dry and then buff it lightly. All it is, is waxes. Mostly carnuba wax. I watched Cindy Drozda and Bonnie Klien use it. Works great.

    One word of caution is if you do buff your work keep it moving and don't put tom much pressure against the wheel. If you don't keep it moving it will heat your finish and cause you some big problems. Then as Bill G. would say "bad words will be said."
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  6. #6
    Some times we over sand. Such fine abrasves soon stop smoothing and begin to burnish, when that happens then the pores of the wood are sealed and then the finish has no where to go. It lays on top and soon you wipe it off and then you find that you only have a minute layer ontop of the wood and none in the wood and so the finish wears off in a heartbeat. Like Stu said, earlier in the sanding process apply a sanding sealer, it makes a bond with the wood as it gets inside the pores, then as you sand smooth a finier finish and apply the finish can bond to the sealer and so the finish is not only on top but inside the wood and a healthy layer can build and not be rubbed off in the process.

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