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Thread: Someone Tar and Feather Me

  1. #1

    Someone Tar and Feather Me

    Yep I think its time someone tarred and feathered me. Maybe its the drywall dust and paint fumes that are getting to me, or maybe its the lack of sawdust I have been making lately. I am not sure but I am about to make the most egregious, naughtiest, nastiest mistake any woodworker can do, and I am about to do it knowing full well I know better...

    Yep I am going to use White Pine for my baseboards.

    The problem is, I realized while I have tons of hardwood, I don't have tons of hardwood of the SAME SPECIES. I got Ash, Oak, Basswood and Popular, but not a thousand feet of he same stuff and that is what its going to take to do all the baseboard in my new house.

    Now the questions...

    Do you think its a good idea to use pine for the baseboards, then do something else for the door trim? What I mean is, I could use a good hardwood like Cheery or Ash for the door trim, but how would that look getting tied into the baseboard? I am even tempted at using white pine for the door trim too. Its just that its easy to obtain. Here in the Pine Tree State they practicably give it away and it comes surfaced on all four sides. If I use my rough lumber, I will spend the majority of my time getting it into a finished board.

    I got one more temptation too, and that is adding curves and brackets to make the baseboard and door trim look seemless, kind of like I did on the outside of my house. Its hard to describe, but basically the top of the baseboard would be horizontal, then sweep upward in an arch as it entered the vertical stiles of the doorframe. In the end the baseboard and door trim would look like it flowed around each room in an un-ending ribbon of straight and curved wood.

    Any thoughts?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Pine............. PAINTED pine would last and be fine on the baseboards, but on the doors etc, it might get tatty looking real soon.

    Why not do your baseboards PAINTED pine, and then the door trim etc in a hard wood

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Travis

    I'm with Stu on the painted baseboard. And I'm not too sure I like the idea you're proposing, maybe I'm too used to "square stuff" in houses but I think the flowing look wouldn't be too great. I'm sure you could pull it off based on the work of yours that I've seen, but I don't know if it really would be worth it in the long run.

    Jay

  4. #4
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    As long as TLOYL is not as wild with a vacuum cleaner as TLOML is, it should be fine. Ours get banged up and dented pretty good from hits with the vacuum cleaner. The dogs probably don't help either. Just a thought. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
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    When Irish Eyes are smiling, they're usually up to something!!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...but most likely, I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, season 3


  5. #5
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    pine is just fine for trim travis but if you`re planning to buy pre-run trim how do you propose to manufacture "seamless curves"?
    another thing to think about....what are your doors-n-windows? if they`re pine too stain and a clear finish will look great!
    if you`re able to buy s4s pine boards for 50-75cents a bf look seriously at popping for a williams-n-hussey.....run your mouldings and if you decide you don`t like the machine for whatever reason they easily bring 75% of new or more on e-bay...( you`ll keep it for life though)
    by doing homemade trim out of affordable material and spraying a clear finish instead of paint you should save several hundred bucks over even the cost of mdf trim and still come out with a hussey....
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Southern yellow pine has been used for trim around here forever. Painted and stained. Not a fan of the stained that much but it's not uncommon at all.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    if you`re planning to buy pre-run trim how do you propose to manufacture "seamless curves"?
    One thing I failed to mention is that I always make my own baseboard. The pre-made kind out of real wood is too expensive for the amount I need, and the cheap stuff is...well...cheap looking. As a certified logger I am not one to buy foam board or whatever that crap is they try to pass off as wood either. Nothing wrong with it really, but I do prefer real wood.

    As far as the Hussey goes, I have heard good things about it, and that is a good idea but still above my budget on this. My plan for the addition has been to keep the material costs down, and then give the addition a high end look by going the extra mile with the labor. What I mean is, shingling a house is cheap, its the labor involved that makes contractors cringe. I went overboard and fancied up the trim details. It made shingling a lot harder and time consuming, but it gives the house that added look. It doesn't look like I just slapped some corner boards on the sides of the house and started shingling. It looks like I put some thought into what I was doing, and I am thinking about doing that here.

    Jay, I deeply respect you, but after mulling this all over yesterday, and doing some thinking, measuring and cost figuring, I think I am going forward with my curved wood idea. I know, its not right to come on here and ask a question, then forge ahead with my plan anyway, but I think I can get the curves to work.

    They are not going to be big in any case. I know full well what you mean by keeping things square in a house, I mean this isn't a yacht right ? I did take some scrap plywood and started doodling up some curves. I liked what I saw and even decided to add them to the corners of the room, along with the door casings.

    Well I started running the baseboards, laying down the majority of the baseboard along the walls, but will in-fill the corners and door casing/ baseboard intersections afterwards. In doing this I found something I really like. This allowed me to really lay down some baseboard in a hurry. It also kept the number of joints along my walls to a bare minimum. In fact in the whole addition I will only have 3 joints that are not intersections or corner sections. By keeping the corners and intersections separate, I can concentrate on these complicated areas in manageable lengths, and do them up in a production mode.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Hi Travis

    Well you know we're going to want pics!

    I don't understand what you mean by this:

    I know, its not right to come on here and ask a question, then forge ahead with my plan anyway

    Of course it is fine to do what you think is right, heck you asked for opinions and got them, I think that is what is so valuable about this place. But I wouldn't expect someone to do something just because I posted a reply.

    Have a great day

    Jay

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post
    Southern yellow pine has been used for trim around here forever. Painted and stained. Not a fan of the stained that much but it's not uncommon at all.
    Eastern White Pine is quite a bit softer than Southern Yellow Pine unfortunately. I have seen both used in flooring however. Actually wide pine floors (24 inch wide or so) are a very common site here, but they are soft. They were very common in the old houses of the 1800's.

    The woman that runs the local hardware store had wide pine floors put in her new home, then to give the floor that "patina" of age, she dragged heavy chain around her new floor to ding and scratch it all up. After about 10 years of life though, the floor was too dinged up so she had it sanded down and redone. Too each their own I guess.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Location
    ozarks
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    4,993
    so travis, are you profiling the base or putting it up square? what are your doors, paint or stain? how `bout the floor....carpet or hardwood?
    most trim is installed by casing out the doors first and butting the base into the casing.....you`re runnin` the base first? how does that work?
    i`m tryin` to get on the same page.....help me out
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

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