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Thread: Proof!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Hamilton, New Zealand


    For those who have misgivings as to whether I actually get the workshop dirty, heres a couple of projects that were completed this weekend. Its a long weekend here so I have had 4 lovely days off to play in the shed.

    Some time ago I made a Morris Chair from the plans in Australian Woodsmith Magazine. Its a bi-monthly mag produced in Aus and quite popular here in New Zealand, and is very much in the vain of the American fine woodworking mag.

    Since the chair was finished I always wanted to do a footstool to compliment it, but when we moved I miss placed the magazine so the stool has been done from memory and is sized to suit the chair. All thats left to do is stain it and give it a coat of poly.

    The trolley you see in the photos is a commissioned piece for a local artist, and is very much a prototype, but I'm pleased with the outcome.

    The timber is Rimu for the main trolley frame, with the shelf bases Macrocarpa as is the lid.

    The removable brush box is made from Kauri. The trolley is on roller which have brakes on the front wheels. For security ( enquiring little minds ) case clips have been located on both sides of the lid with a small padlock for security.
    Err ... Me, make a mistake .. Never

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Very nice stuff Ralph. What a great place to put your feet up. I love the wedged double tenon(?) detail on the stool.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Waterford, MI
    Very nice. But I still dont see no dirt
    Link to my ongoing ClearVue DC Install on CV's site: http://www.gallery2.clearvuecyclones...s-Mini-CV1400/

  4. #4
    Very nice Ralph! The footstool is quite striking with the straight grain. It's nice to see something other than white oak.
    Rimu is a wood I'm not familiar with - at least by that name.


    PS I still think your workshop is clean.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Tokyo Japan
    Going to have to agree with the others, very nice work!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Great work! I like specially the use of a single wedge to spread the tenons, It's a detail I might use sometime, with your permission of course
    Best regards,

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Thanks for the feed back folks. I had thought of single wedge for the tenons but had put a temporary piece of ply in to hold the stretchers till I had the Jarrah pieces ready. I looked at it for a while and thought, why not one piece just as something a little different.

    BTW the wood is Douglas Fir from Canada. I love wood that has history about it and it turns out this does.

    The timber comes from a demolition yard that recently demolished and old army stores center in Auckland. The Army depot was built in 1939 from imported flitches of Douglas Fir from Canada. The main reason for this is the increased density of the wood. In one piece I counted 120 growth rings and this board was only about one fifth of the log as close as we could ascertain. We have since found pieces with 200 plus growth rings so at least some of that footstool is over 250 years old. Now thats woody history. It also makes for a great sales pitch too

    This is what it looks like raw.. see piccy below.

    P.S One of my next projects is to replace the kitchen bench top. The Formica top has split by the bowl edge and the underlying timber is swelling. Typical particle board construction. The top will be made from heart Rimu which is very hard. Again the timber was milled 60 or 70 years ago and is so dry and hard its a bit like Aussie hardwood, but the color when finished will be outstanding. I will finish the top with a edging of Macrocarpa to give it a final piece of contrast.

    I will take some photos as the process gets underway.
    Last edited by Ralph Mckenzie; 10-24-2007 at 06:54 AM.
    Err ... Me, make a mistake .. Never

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