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Thread: Wood rack on block walls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Wood rack on block walls

    Looking for ideas on how to attach a wood rack, could be heavily loaded at times. To a concrete (cinder) block wall.

    I have used tapcon screws for a lot things and really impressed with them. But I don't think I would trust on them on a wood rack. I am leaning toward toggle bolts. But still looking at the moment.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
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  2. #2
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    I use 1/4" toggle bolts. As a matter of fact, I just bought a new Rigid 1/2" hammer drill to drill the holes. It requires a 3/4" bit. I am getting ready to hang my DC, and need to bolt a stud wall to the concrete block in my basement.

  3. #3
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    I don't like the idea of drilling into block. I'm sure its done all the time but I'd rather not do it all the same. A while ago a fellow was looking for ways to hang cabinets in a basement shop and he didn't want to drill holes either. I sketched out the following for him. In that case it was a french cleat system hanging from vertical members that are both hooked over the top of the wall and also screwed or bolted to the joists above.



    For a lumber rack maybe you would run the verticals to the floor and perhaps there'd be another set of them out away from the wall a bit tied to the ones against the wall so they couldn't/wouldn't buckle outward.

    Or maybe you could get by with a single anchor at the mid point into the wall.

    p.s. pardon the block wall texture. I didn't notice it was wrong when I applied it and didn't bother going back to fix it.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  4. #4
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    Ask Tod about his heavy duty wood rack.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
    I've always used the old stand-by lead anchors for heavy stuff. I started using Tapcons for cabinets etc. My rack which holds mostly smaller pieces of stock and my miter saw is comprised of the heavy adjustable shelf brackets. The stanchions are mounted with lead anchors.

    FWIW,
    Wes

  6. #6
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    I have a unusual area I want to put mine. Dave, I was at first thinking 4x4's with pipe. Attaching them to the joists and resting on the floor similar to what you show. Then I found a rack I like and I have the lumber in the barn so I can build it free.

    I have long outfeed tables at the RAS and lots of space on the wall that is wasted. I want to put them there. Will get some photos and scan a photo of the rack I want to build. It will help make sense of what I need. I probably can reinforce the table and let it rest on there, but the joists don't line up like I would like. And I want some shorter rack over the saw, so I have work around that. Photos will follow latter on today.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  7. #7
    I think you would be best suited by building a wood rack that is supported by the floor and use the wall as a means to stabilize or secure in place. In other words, make it reach the floor and support the weight and then bolt it to the wall to keep it from falling over or collapsing

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    I think you would be best suited by building a wood rack that is supported by the floor and use the wall as a means to stabilize or secure in place. In other words, make it reach the floor and support the weight and then bolt it to the wall to keep it from falling over or collapsing
    I'm with Bill. Holding something still takes much less effort that holding something up. We all hate to give up the floor space but sometimes it is the best solution.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
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    This is the rack I am thinking of building, it's from Wood magazine. They show being able to put the arms in every 6" inches or so and that seems ridiculously close to me. Looks like you might get 3 boards on each one, so I will spread out the spacing to something more practical.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have roughly four foot on the left side of the saw. Roughly eight foot on the right side. I will let the wood overlap the upper half of the windows to gain longer board storage space. I want to add shorter racks on either side of the RAS I want the racks to go to or near to the ceiling. I can stand on the tables and access the wood near the ceiling no problem

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's not practical for me to run this to the floor because of the outfeed tables. I could reinforce the outfeed tables with additional legs at the rear and let the racks rest of the tables. Again, not my first choice even though I don't have any intentions of moving these. This is the only long space I had, so it's staying.

    I just had a thought. I could run the racks, just shy of the table. Add some wedge shaped shims under them and just tap them in place.. That way if I ever needed to adjust a table, replace the top or what ever I could remove the wedges and then the tables, leaving the rack in place..

    I could move the table and saw out form the wall, but that would leave a space for 'stuff' to fall behind the tables. That tables are bolted to the saw frame. So it's not an easy job to move these. Not to mention all the wood stored in there that would have to be removed.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  10. #10
    Jeff,
    Why not go with the Wood magazine plan, with Dave's attachment method? That would solve some of the issues with your tables, yet still allow the majority of the weight to be held by the structure above versus the anchors in the wall.

    Just a thought,
    Wes

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