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Thread: Reworking the Neck

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Reworking the Neck

    If you were following this thread, you already know the trials and tribulations I've been through on this hollow form. When I reworked the neck the first time, I didn't get it centered exactly, so the curve on the neck was uneven. Tonight I came up with a way to get it really centered, so I had another go at the neck shaping. I wanted to share it here in case it might give some of you other turners a few ideas.

    A while back I bought an Asian import live center set on sale from one of the online woodworking stores. (Don't recall where I bought it.) One of the "points" that came with it is a 3/8" pin. Looks like this:

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    So I grabbed a scrap piece of alder, cut it into a cylinder about 4" or 5" long and about 2 1/2" in diameter, and drilled a 3/8" hole in one end:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mounted it with the spur center, and after a few minutes with the skew, I had a cone that looked like this, with the pin stuck into the tailstock end of the cone:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Next, I removed the spur center from the headstock, mounted the faceplate part of my donut chuck, stuck the cone into the hollow form, and tightened the tailstock just enough to hold it firmly in place. I didn't want to get it too tight and crack the neck. I added a piece of 1/4" closed cell foam ("Fun Foam" from the craft supply stores like Michael's) to pad the base of the hollow form and to provide some friction to turn the piece. It's not attached, just held in place by friction. Here are a couple shots before I started turning it. The first shot shows how uneven the curve of the neck is:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And here's a shot after the shaping. I used very light cuts, and started sanding at 220 grit. The lathe is running in this shot, and you'll see there's no "ghost line" at the neck, an indication I got things trued up correctly this time. (I also was able to add a bit more curve, which I think helped the overall form.)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And finally a sneak peek at the new neck, with a fresh coat of Antique Oil. I'll shoot some "finished" pics in a few days when it's done.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails HF037 - Reworked Neck - 08 800.jpg  
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  2. #2
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    Very well done Vaughn, that necessity is really a mother ain't it

    FYI, the 3/8" pin on the live center is really great, but if you just have a cup and pin live center, it would do the same thing.

    Looks better each time, but I'd stop now if I were you, one more "return" and you might just launch it.....

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    ...FYI, the 3/8" pin on the live center is really great, but if you just have a cup and pin live center, it would do the same thing...
    I agree, although I think the pin gives marginally better stability, while still allowing you to keeping the tailstock pressure light. A regular live center would be more prone to slip under as light of pressure as I used on this one. It also stays in place nicely when mounting the piece, so you don't need a third hand to keep the cone in place while you tighten the tailstock down.

    Now that I've tried this, I suspect I'll be making other tailstock attachments for reversing pieces. This cone will also be handy for centering hollow forms with the mouth pointed out, either in the donut chuck, or with a vacuum chuck. (For the next time I need to rework a heck or mouth.)

    I agree that I need to quit pressing my luck with this one, and call it done. And I'll be holding it extra tight when I buff it in a few days.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
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    The "light pressure" remark is very true, if you use a normal pointy live center, this might not work, but a point and cup....


    like the Oneway item pictured above, much more stability than just a point, but yeah, your pin would be best. I think, maybe that pin thing is for turning lamps.......

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Harvey, Michigan
    Posts
    687
    Nice work Vaughn! Amazing how a little adjustment to the curve of the neck adds to the form of the piece! I'd say it was worth the effort and thanks for the setup photos - just never know when something like that will come in handy!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Pickles Gap, Arkansas
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    Nice work, Vaughn!
    If you have a pulse you have a purpose...

  7. #7
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    Dear Vaughn,

    Wow! Thanks for this. Without knowing it, you just showed me how to fix the half-hollowed bowl I blew up around midnight last night.

    I'll send pics when I can...

    Thanks,

    Bill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
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    Nice work Vaughn. It came out a beauty. Like Stu said you had better stop now. I thought I saw Murphy lurking around the corner.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
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    618
    Beautifully done, Vaughn!! It's a winner.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Jiutepec Morelos, Mexico
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    230
    Vaughn,
    I like this kind of thread
    Great HF
    Saludos
    Alfredo

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