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Thread: Applying Behlen's Rock Hard Varnish

  1. #1
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    Applying Behlen's Rock Hard Varnish

    I am looking for some tips on what most would consider the proper application of Rock Hard varnish. Is it best to apply with a rag or a brush? If a brush, should it be foam or bristle? Is it better to cut the varnish (with what?), or just use it straight out of the can?

    Thanks very much in advance for any advice!!!


    - Keith (Rookie Finisher)
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  2. #2
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    Never heard of it. Sounds like a possible good finish for pens. Let us know what you learn. Would Behlen's be a good source for that info? Just wonderin'
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  3. #3
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    I would think this is a brush on varnish. I've never used it. I would recommend checking with where you are purchasing it from and ask them.

  4. #4
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    Keith,
    It's a brush-on varnish, not a wipe-on. You could probably thin it by 1/3 ~ 1/2 and wipe it on, though.

    DO NOT (!) use a foam brush! The solvent for the Rock Hard will eat the foam. (DAMHIKT)

    I've used Rock Hard on several different tables over the years, and all have worn well. I used several coats, scuff sanding between coats, and then, after several weeks, sanded to 800 ~ 1000 and polished with compound, then waxed. Got a beautiful finish!

    My dining room tabletop - which has never seen a table cloth - looks as good today as it did ten years ago.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    Jim....or anyone else for that matter...I have yet another question about getting to a final product with Rock Hard. I applied a third and final coat to my project about five days ago. It's been sitting in a dry, warm spot since then, untouched. Unfortunately, I'm not going to have "several weeks" to let it sit before I do final sanding/polishing/waxing, as this will be under the tree on Christmas morning. I will probably give it until this Saturday. My first question is, will not letting it rest for several weeks affect its overall hardness or look?

    Also, you mentioned that you sanded to 800-1000 grit, then polished and waxed. I've been scuff sanding with 320 between coats. Should I start the final sanding process higher than this, or is 320 a good start? Also, how many grit levels did you hit?

    Thanks very much for any guidance you can give.

    Regards,

    Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Starosta View Post
    Jim....or anyone else for that matter...I have yet another question about getting to a final product with Rock Hard. I applied a third and final coat to my project about five days ago. It's been sitting in a dry, warm spot since then, untouched. Unfortunately, I'm not going to have "several weeks" to let it sit before I do final sanding/polishing/waxing, as this will be under the tree on Christmas morning. I will probably give it until this Saturday. My first question is, will not letting it rest for several weeks affect its overall hardness or look?

    Also, you mentioned that you sanded to 800-1000 grit, then polished and waxed. I've been scuff sanding with 320 between coats. Should I start the final sanding process higher than this, or is 320 a good start? Also, how many grit levels did you hit?

    Thanks very much for any guidance you can give.

    Regards,

    Keith
    It oughta be dry/cured enough to pose no problems. Just proceed carefully. If it feels sofe, then you'll have to wait some more, but after the eight or ten days you're talking about, you should be good to go.

    As fot the sanding regimen - I'd start with 400, then 600, 800, and 1000. Got to 1200, 1500, and 2000 if you think it needs it, but 1000 ought to be enough. Then, go to gray and/or white scotchbrite, and use it to apply the wax. For a complete, brilliant gloss, use an automobile polishing compound, or Behlen's "Deluxing Compound" (pretty much the same thing, but much more expensive) before waxing.

    Let's see some pictures when you're done.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
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    Good deal, Jim. Thanks!!!

    I'll absolutely post pictures in my project thread over in the flatwork forum.

    - Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

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