Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Radiant Ceiling Heaters?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    27

    Radiant Ceiling Heaters?

    Has anyone heard of Solid State Heating Corp. and their radiant ceiling heaters called ENERJOY Radiant Peopleheaters? http://www.sshcinc.com/BarNone2.htm
    They are sort of expensive upfront but I am thinking in the long run they will save me some money on the electricity bill. I found an article from Fine Woodworking Tools & Shop 2001 magazine where a guy used them in his shop and he was very pleased with them. I like the idea of no moving parts, no maintenance and no noise and the fact that they are mounted on the ceiling where they are out of the way.

    I would like to find someone that is using this type heater to hear what there opinion is about this heating system.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    2,070
    Hi Joe, They sound interesting but I wouldn't be sold on them. They mentioned about base board heaters. Houses and heating systems are designed a certain way for a reason. Hot air rises. Heating down from the ceiling just makes no sence. We use the base board heaters in front of windows for a reason. They produce a warm wall of heat that forces the colder air coming off the window up to the ceiling, forcing it to mix with the warm air and filling the room with that heated air at the same time circulating the air. Forced air systems work in the same way and are put under windows for the same reason. Not saying that they are no good I am just pointing out how and why we have the systems that we do.

    Drew
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    2,070
    Hi Joe, They sound interesting but I wouldn't be sold on them. They mentioned about base board heaters. Houses and heating systems are designed a certain way for a reason. Hot air rises. Heating down from the ceiling just makes no sence. We use the base board heaters in front of windows for a reason. They produce a warm wall of heat that forces the colder air coming off the window up to the ceiling, forcing it to mix with the warm air and filling the room with that heated air at the same time circulating the air. Forced air systems work in the same way and are put under windows for the same reason. Not saying that these systems they are selling are no good I am just pointing out how and why we have the systems that we do.

    Drew
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    535
    Looks interesting Joe, easy installation, no idea how well they'd work, thats more a question of how tight the house is and BTU output, etc. Big question is where do you get the power, and how much do the units draw.

    My grandfather's house in Oregon had radiant ceiling heat, encapsulated in the horrible popcorn ceiling. That was just wires more like this company's underfloor product. Seemed to work well, each room had its own thermostat. Under floor might be preferable, but ceiling is a lot easier to retrofit - aside from the wiring.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,828
    I've seen those, or similar in use. They throw an incredible amount of heat down. Have to because heat naturally rises. Seem very inefficient to me. I think they also work on the infra red principle like heat lamps that just warm the subject when standing in the ray but not the air. I would consider only as a last resort when no other system is practical.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Southeast Pa
    Posts
    2,019
    The key word is radiant. Radiant heat doesn't rise. Warm air rises. Radiant heat goes away from the radiant source in all directions. The sun is one form of radiant heat and is pretty effective.

    The heat radiating on a surface them warms that surface and it sinks heat into the air ect and then it rises. I have been in houses with radiant heat and didn't care for it. If you were shadowed you were chilly. For example sitting at a table your legs and feet would be very chilly while your head, arms and torso would be fine.

    You get some secondary transfer of heat from the warmed items to the air and then convection will move it around some(mostly up).

    I wasn't impressed with what I was around but that was thirty years ago..

    Garry

  7. #7
    Radiant heaters are often used in industrial situations. You'll often see them on loading docks or in factories. I actually noticed some recently in our local HD above the checkout counter where the doors are constantly opening and closing.

    I looked very hard at radiant floor heat and would have had it in my shop except for some building permit problems and plumbing problems. I also looked at overhead radiant tube heat but that was the problem. I had no idea my hair was getting a little thin on top and in the back. A couple of years ago when I still smoked, I went to the designated smoking area outside of a local hospital. The area is covered and heated with electric radiant heat tubes.....when the thermostat turned on the heat, my scalp felt it in back and on top. Yup....gonna look like my maternal grandfather!With overhead radiant heat tubes, there is a minimum height requirement or they can actually create some overheating problems on wood and other things. My shop has 10' ceilings and it was borderline to the top of my work surfaces.
    Ken
    ------



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    146

    Love mine . . .

    As I've got an open ceiling the overhead mounted radiant heater is the way to go. Slightly of to the side and over the bench. I've discovered the effective " fan " of warm goes out farther to the sides than I though it would, so in my 10 x 10 shop I'm good almost eveywhere except right behind it. Get one with two elements / rods. One rod ( low ) for chilly mornings and two for " London Broil ". Only issue I had was my Big Dremel hanging right in front of the heater. No other choices for placement of either so I hung a peice of " tin foil " on one side of the Dremel hanger " between " them. No more issue. Still waiting for the 'lectric bill to see if I'm saveing as much as the hype says. I'd still use it but it'd be easier to justify staying toasty even when I'm not glueing.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
    Posts
    1,941
    I will get the brand a fellow ww has in his shop. It keeps the shop nice and toasty and runs offf propane.

  10. #10
    Last Christmas, I bought each of the boys a 1500 BTU Radiant unit that mounts to the ceiling above their work area. My son mounted his on a Lazy Susan bearing so he can turn it to different areas of his garage. Over his shoulder when he is at his workbench, directed toward the exercise equipment for his son, or toward the car, depending on the task at hand. My S-I-L liked the idea and I gave hime a bearing but yet it is not been done. Both boys liked the radiant heat directed toward them which kept them warm although the rest of their garages were shy of warmth. S-I-L has a wood stove and after a while the heat would catchup and negate the need for the heater.

    My experience with ceiling mounted radiant heat. I heat my garage with a Propane Radiant heater. Again heats only in the direction it is pointed. I used the same heater in the houseboat during the winter, Although in an inclosed structure, we go in and out so often there is an air exchange (we turn it off at night and rely on sleeping bags for warmth) But I also have a pot of boiling water on the stove which puts humidity in the room and gives something for the radiation to heat, that way it can warm a larger area.

Similar Threads

  1. Heaters ......
    By Rob Keeble in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 02-02-2013, 09:16 PM
  2. Shop Heaters
    By Jonathan Shively in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-12-2009, 03:10 PM
  3. Retrofit - Radiant Floor Heating
    By Brent Dowell in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-22-2007, 07:35 AM
  4. radiant heat
    By larry merlau in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-21-2007, 07:42 PM
  5. Furnace of New Radiant heater?
    By Jeff Horton in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-13-2006, 03:10 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •