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Thread: I got a screw loose...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Carroll, Ohio
    Posts
    9

    I got a screw loose...

    I hope someone has a solution for this problem. I have a relatively new Delta benchtop belt/disk sander. The problem is that the disk plate won't stay tight on the shaft. The little set screw that holds it on the shaft comes loose after a few minutes of use no matter how tight I can get it with an allen wrench. If it weren't for the dust guard around the disk, the thing would probably fall off and go skating across the garage floor. I've replaced the set screw twice thinking that would fix the problem but no luck. I suppose I could put a drop of Loctite on it but then I would never get the screw loose if needed. Anybody got any suggestions?
    Tom Hempleman
    www.wildwoodhill.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    DO try the Locktite - it won't glue it so tight that you can't get it loose. It will keep it from vibrating loose on its own.

    -Kevin in Indy
    "Heroic? He fell off his bloody Aeroplane!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    run another set screw down on top of the first.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    You are talking about the disc part of the sander, that goes onto a motor shaft of some kind? Does it just slide on, or does it screw on to the motor shaft?

    You could drill and tap a second set screw hole, like Tod suggests, an or you could change the set screw, what kind is it, is it flat on the bottom or pointed? A pointed set screw might grab better on the motor shaft, and once you get it positioned just right, crank down on the set screw, then take it off, and you will have a small mark on the motor shaft, you could then drill a VERY shallow hole, like 1/32" deep, for the set screw to hold into.

    Loctite is your friend, in this case, I's use the blue stuff, NOT the red, the red is really, really hard to get loose again, usually requiring a heat gun or such.

    Good luck, I'm sure you can cure this problem.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Dec 2006
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    Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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    Hey Stu,

    I don't think that is what Tod is saying. I read it as another one on TOP of the first, kind of like two nuts tightening each other together on a screw.

    I think!
    Regards,
    Bill Antonacchio

  6. #6
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    ozarks
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    bill`s correct,
    S.O.P. on lotsa vibration prone pulleys ect. is to run another set screw down on top of the first to lock it in place.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  7. #7
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    Tokyo Japan
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    OK, I see what you mean, this might entail removing the existing set screw and getting two shorter ones?
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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    185
    Depends, if the hole has some room and there is sufficient clearance then just putting another on top with a slight protrusion will work.

    I first saw this in 1963 from an old timer in the Western Union labs. Someone need a quick fix on a set screw on a machine while making a prototype and the lab foreman was asked by the engineer to get it fixed in a hurry. He added the second allen screw and left. We just stood there dumbfounded.
    Regards,
    Bill Antonacchio

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,832
    There are different kinds of Loctite. I have used red for decades on gun parts. With right screwdriver, it can be removed again. But check info on packages. Another solution might just be to mess up the threads on the screw. Make them rough with another tool, that often prevents loosening. Learned that from a race car mechanic.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    bill`s correct,
    S.O.P. on lotsa vibration prone pulleys ect. is to run another set screw down on top of the first to lock it in place.
    I have done this in more than one case with success.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

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