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Thread: Seeking a safe jig for holding small or odd shaped pieces on a router table

  1. #1
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    Seeking a safe jig for holding small or odd shaped pieces on a router table

    In the thread: http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ead.php?t=7083 I reported that the jig that I purchased to hold small parts:

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    had proven to be a disappointment. The two clamping surfaces a strictly parallel, and they are not good at hold really odd shaped pieces such as those shown in the photo below:

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    I found one of two things. The ratcheting mechanism would slip when attempting to tighten the jaws around the part or the jaws would tighten on the part but they would be gripping such a small portion of the edges that the router would tear it loose in action.

    The combined use of pliers and a hold down stick as shown above did the trick. In talking to others about this pliers technique and in thinking about it some more I realized that I should not have used it. If the pliers had ever touched to bit, things could have flown.

    Arthur on the Canadian Woodworking forum suggested “How about a woodscrew clamp--no need for parallel surfaces to clamp on”:

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    Both Ken in Regina and I suggested augmenting the clamping of the woodscrews surface with sandpaper. I glued strips of 100 grit Norton sandpaper to the clamping surfaces of a 10 inch Jorgensen woodscrew with 3M Super 77 spray adhesive.

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    I tested this with about 20 pieces of various shapes and sizes and with 4 different router bits. The routing job was good and nothing slipped .
    Cheers, Frank

  2. #2
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    I have that commerical jig also and like you found it pretty useless. I like your solution. Good idea.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the post Frank. I was faced with a similar situation and was considering the commercial jig you and Allen were dissappointed with. Something made me hold off on buying it and I'm glad I did. The clamp solution is so obvious once seen. Yet another "now why didn't I think of that?" moment for me.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Thanks for the post Frank. I was faced with a similar situation and was considering the commercial jig you and Allen were dissappointed with. Something made me hold off on buying it and I'm glad I did. The clamp solution is so obvious once seen. Yet another "now why didn't I think of that?" moment for me.
    Glenn stole the words right out of my fingertips. I've been looking at the commercial holders, but they just didn't seem robust enough to do battle with a router bit, so I hadn't bought one. The screw clamp, on the other hand, looks like the ticket. You could even fabricate custom jaws if it ever became necessary. Great solution!
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    I prefer to control the router and adhere the small pieces to a base. I use either hot glue or doublesided tape to hold the piece to a flat surface (could be the router table or work bench or sheet of plywood scrap. then hold the small trim router or your massive wood hog in your "Safe from harm" hands and cut from above, not below. Blood is so much harder to clean up than the chips spewed by the router. Besides, distroyed wood is easier to replace than distroyed finger tips, or gnawed up Hand screw clamps.

  6. #6
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    Hi Frank
    I was watching your thread on both forums and I would like to suggest this jig.

    You can make it with one "clamp" or 2~3 "clamps" for bigger workpieces

    Take some board....I used 5/16" Floor panel but you can use plywood or MDF of 5/16"~1/2" thick and push a T-nut (or a few T-nuts...for a few "clamps")



    Drill a large hole to sink the T-nut so it will be just below the board surface



    Take a length of threaded rod and screw a nut...



    Screw the threaded rod into the T-nut but do not protrude below the board surface...



    Tight the nut to lock the threaded rod...



    Take some scrap to be used as "clamp", drill a hole, glue sanding paper (or anti-skid tape).... if you want you can make a leg or, you can use same thickness scrap as a support...
    The "clamp" that you see on the picture is from other jig and it's too long so please make yours to fit the board...also, I recommend to use a 2" or more wide "clamp" for better holding.



    Adjust the leg height (or use a scrap at the same thinness as the workpiece)..put large washer....



    A knob with T-nut will do the rest








    If you want to quickly install/remove the threaded rod, you can use wing nut instead of the nut


    You can add handles to the board and just slide it on the router table....


    Regards
    niki

  7. #7
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    That should work well Niki. I will make something similiar to what you suggest early in 2008, give it a try with various typical peices and bits , then report back in this thread.
    Last edited by Frank Pellow; 12-22-2007 at 06:25 PM.
    Cheers, Frank

  8. #8
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    Niki, you could start a whole secondary market for leftover flooring. Love your posts.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
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    Glenn
    You are going to see a lot of "Floor panels" in my posts

    I "discovered" them while flooring my living room...HDF covered with plastic laminate from both sides and if I get a 15 years guaranty for walking on them, they are good enough for jigs...

    Except covering the router table, I use them for table saw sleds, hand router auxiliary base, circular saw auxiliary base, sawboard (CS guide) and many other applications and...they "love" CA (super glue) so it's very easy to work with them.

    Regards
    niki

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