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Thread: Sometimes I amaze myself

  1. #1

    Sometimes I amaze myself

    I have been re-working a Wood body for a 1912 Model T Towncar (all wood construction) Some mistakes were made in the original construction and I am contracted to fix the errors. One problem was to remove one of the ribs (wrong location) set in a dado and screwed in place, before the curved plywood skin was glued on.. How to get it out intact w/o much damage to the skin.... Lucky the fit was bad enough to locate where the screw was located. Marked where I thought it would be...


    Took a piece of Plywood and drilled a 5/8" hole as a guide and clamped over the location...


    Bored a hole with a Forstner bit till the tip touched the screw head...


    Used a scratch Awl to dig out the remaining wood to expose the screwhead...


    Backed out the screw and pounded the rib through the dado (rebate) ....


    Inserted a 5/8" bung I cut with a plug cutter, with a little glue and some sanding, the job is A-OK...

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Pretty neat! Can we see some more pics of the body?

    What woods are you using? I seem to recall tha many of the original bodies of that era were mainly of ash and birch, and that some of the later 'woodies' were ash and mahogany.

    I know that many folks aren't aware that many of the teens/twenties/thirties car bodies were actually metal skins over wooden framework. Some (Packard, etc.) had some very nice woodwork in their under-framing, and others were were pretty crude.

    As a kid, I used to hang around a shop where they did a fair amout of repair/restoration of older stuff - like Essex, Hudsons, Packards, etc. Back then I found it amazint that some cars were actually made of wood! Of course, British Morgans still are, aren't they?
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
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    Oct 2006
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    Charleston
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    This is the classic way for many of the elegant old cars (Dusenberg's, etc) that coach builders used to form the bodies and lines. Congrats on a great project.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2007
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    El Paso, TX
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    I'd like to see . . .

    the structural elements also. The ribs and such from what wood. Very interesting. How you could build a vehical that would stand up to such abuse out of wood and look good to. Kind of like building the bigest plane in the world out of plywood. I've done a wood canoe but it didn't take the stresses this would.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Albuquerque, New Mexico
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    Man, you nailed it!

    When I was a kid I helped a neighbor restore a 1928 Durant (sp?). I probably didnít do much but I remember sanding those spoke wheels like it was yesterday!

    Iíd love to see more of the Towncar.
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
    friend...if you have one."
    --George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

    "Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second..if there is
    one."
    --Winston Churchill, in response




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