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Thread: Arkie question?

  1. #1
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    Arkie question?

    what is mayhaw jelly made from? had some given to me from the daughter who got it dwn there. tastes great so if yus know what tis made frum let me's no
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  2. #2
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    Larry, this is from Wikipedia:

    Mayhaw is the name given to the fruit of three species of hawthorn that are common in wetlands throughout the southern United States.
    Mayhaws grow in moist soil in river and creek bottoms under hardwood trees. The fruit ripens in late April through May, thus the name mayhaw. The fruit is also found in bayous surrounding lakes, such as Caddo Lake on the Texas/Louisiana border. Mayhaws are often collected out of the water from boats to be used to make jelly. Mayhaw jelly is considered by some to be among the finest jellies in the world.
    Families used to go on outings to collect mayhaws and create stockpiles of the jelly to last throughout the year, but the tradition has declined as with the increasing urbanization of the South and the destruction of the mayhaw's native habitat. The fruit has also been cultivated to grow outside of wetlands and this is increasing the source of the jelly.
    As a celebrated delicacy of Southern U.S. cuisine, many communities associate themselves with the fruit: for example, Colquitt, Georgia, is considered the Mayhaw capital of the world, and El Dorado, Arkansas, celebrates a mayhaw festival each May.
    Nancy Laird
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  3. #3
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    thanks

    nancy for the help in this,, must be i got real gift from what you found for me i tried to find what the fruit looked like in your link but got nowhere just that it was simaliar to a apple.. tastes great though.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
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    Larry, I've seen Mayhaw jelly around a few place, but to my knowledge I have never tried it.
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  5. #5
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    Mayhaw jelly is made from the berries of the Hee-Haw tree.
    You can also make it in June, July, & August but it’s not as tasty.
    Last edited by Bruce Page; 01-02-2008 at 07:55 PM.
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
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  6. #6
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    Nancy, wished you hadn't jumped in with a serious answer so quick.
    I wuz jes gonna tel him it's made from Mayhaws.
    Truth is, I had never heard of it until now.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Truth is, I had never heard of it until now.
    Frank.....

    And you call yourself a good Arkansan??? I'm from Tennessee and I've heard of it before...but never ate any. Next time I'm through Arkansas I'll have to stop and find some to try.

    Nancy
    Nancy Laird
    dandnspecialties@msn.com
    FWW Registered Voter and Voting Member
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!!


    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' If you love your country, thank a vet.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nancy Laird View Post
    Frank.....

    And you call yourself a good Arkansan??? I'm from Tennessee and I've heard of it before...but never ate any. Next time I'm through Arkansas I'll have to stop and find some to try.

    Nancy
    The Ozarks and southern part of our state have very different weather and eco systems. From the locations you mention, I suspect the tree does not grow in the northen part of our state.
    Next, somebody is going to ask about muscadines.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    The Ozarks and southern part of our state have very different weather and eco systems. From the locations you mention, I suspect the tree does not grow in the northen part of our state.
    Next, somebody is going to ask about muscadines.
    Muscadines (Vitis rotundifolia) are a grapevine species native to the present-day southeastern United States that has been extensively cultivated since the 16th Century. Its recognized range in the United States extends from New York south to Florida, and west to Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. They are well adapted to their native warm and humid climate; they need fewer chilling hours than better known varieties and they thrive on summer heat.
    The muscadine berries range from bronze to dark purple to black in color when ripe. They have skin sufficiently tough that eating the raw fruit often involves biting a small hole in the skin to suck out the pulp inside. Muscadines are not only eaten fresh, but also are used in making wine, juice, and jelly.
    Although in the same genus Vitis with the other grapevine species, muscadines belong to a separate subgenus, Muscadinia (the other grapevine species belong to subgenus Vitis), and some have suggested giving it standing as a genus of its own. Some taxonomists have also suggested splitting two additional species off from Vitis rotundifolia, Vitis munsoniana and Vitis popenoei. All have 40 chromosomes, rather than 38, are generally not cross-compatibile with other Vitis species, and most hybrids between the subgenera are sterile. A few, however, are at least moderately fertile, and have been used in breeding. The cultivar 'Southern Home', released by the University of Florida, contains both muscadine and subgenus Vitis in its background.
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
    friend...if you have one."
    --George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

    "Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second..if there is
    one."
    --Winston Churchill, in response




  10. #10
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    Huh.....I'd of guessed it was made from road killed armadillo's
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