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Thread: Making a Brush Video

  1. #1
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    Making a Brush Video

    Forgive me if this was posted before (couldn't find it). For some reason I find this mesmerizing: http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/e...rushShortX.mov
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #2
    On the discovery channel they have a show called Hows its Made. Its a cool show because in hour they might show 3 separate products and how they are made. They don't go into huge details, but just show the general tooling, the methods and the steps involved. Its everything from apple juice to making end mills,and as a machinist I find the show very interesting. The wife however does not...

    Then again this is the same woman that absolutely hates Married with Children and Dukes of Hazzard,obviously very fine 80's shows!!
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Johnson View Post
    Then again this is the same woman that absolutely hates Married with Children and Dukes of Hazzard,obviously very fine 80's shows!!
    I just don't get some girls(?).
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
    The older I get, the more I realize my life is just like Al Bundy's.

    I'm more of a Tiffany Amber Thiessen fan, but for some reason I like Christina Applegate's acting on that show.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
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    Interesting process. I'm guessing these are high-end brushes. If it takes that long to make each brush head, they must be selling for a relatively high price. I always wondered why some brushes were so much more expensive than others. I'm guessing this is part of the reason why.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    My local hardware store has to special order me my brushes because while they used to sell Purdy, they said no one but me bought any. They are just too expensive for most people I guess.

    Myself I consider them cheap. Like I noticed they still make their furrels out of copper and they use a boars hair for the bristles. I used to use foam brushes for poly but had the sharp edges cut and rip the foam brushes, especially on my first coats. Now I use Purdy brushes to apply the first 2-3 coats. Since these brushes last forever, I can deduct their 20 dollar cost over many projects and many years making them cheaper in the long run then buying 69 cent foam brushes for each successive coat. I do howver use a foam brush on thelast couple of coats just to get a nice smooth finish. By then though the surface is so smooth and slippery the foam brushes do not tear.

    As for the cheap bristled brushes, I gave up on those long ago. Not having a bristle in my final finish is priceless. I still think I have the first Purdy brush I ever bought and that was 15 years ago. I buy more, not because they wear out but because of the different sizes, the bristle type and the different finishes I use.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Interesting process. I'm guessing these are high-end brushes. If it takes that long to make each brush head, they must be selling for a relatively high price. I always wondered why some brushes were so much more expensive than others. I'm guessing this is part of the reason why.
    The Gramercy 2" is just under $40 so definitely not for the occasional user but not completely out of site for the serious hobbyist. I forget if it was a Jewitt or a Dresdner (or one of the other half a dozen finishing gurus) article that put me on to them. Haven't tried one yet but, I also have never found a brush to be satisfactory (haven't tried a Purdy either so probably my fault).
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
    Fine Woodworking had a little paragraph in their last issue dedicated to Gramercy Brushes touting them up. They use Ox hair for the bristles which I find interesting...though probably the Ox of this world don't. I'm not sure what Purdy uses, but I think it depends on the type of brush. Poly is different then latex paint, and latex paint has different bristles then what is used for Spar varnish...etc, etc, etc

    I'm a Purdy fan though,won't use anything else.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  9. #9
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    I had a good lesson when I was a kid in the value of quality brushes. We were doing a fair amount of interior house painting in the process of moving out of
    one house and into another (and fixing up a third house somewhere in the middle). I remember we started out with budget brushes and rollers, but my dad quickly got frustrated with the quality so he bought better stuff. The 4" brushes were about $25 as I recall, and in the late 60's that was a lot of cash for a paintbrush. After using them though, and seeing how they lasted as long as they were cleaned well after use, I recognized the value. A good brush will hold more paint, lay a much better line, leave a better finish with less work, and last longer. Give me a good 4" brush and there's not much on a house I can't paint cleanly. (Had a lot of practice on steel casement windows over the years.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
    Holy moly...a 4 inch brush. You should see the carnage I get with a 2 inch sash brush. I would paint everything but the wall with a 4 inch brush!!

    You are right though. A quality brush holds the material a lot better, and lets it flow out better too. I had problems cutting in around trim and stuff until I used a Purdy. Now I lay down some paint, wipe up any drips and move on. No fancy and time consuming blue painters tape to apply, and no second cut-in coats either. It's all in the brush.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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