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Thread: My favorite type of saws, now to build one!

  1. #1
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    My favorite type of saws, now to build one!

    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:49 AM.

  2. #2
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    Please post the progress on the saw! I have a dovetail saw I am trying to make, it is just taking me a looooong time since I only work on it a little every once in a while. You may incite me to work on it some more!

  3. #3
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    No, I have no saw problem, not at all...

    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:50 AM.

  4. #4
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:50 AM.

  5. #5
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    The handle is rough cut and is waiting for me to finish cutting the teeth. Mike W. was kind enough to post a copy of one of his handle patterns a while back. I'm making the blade from a joint tape knife. I made a brake from Leif had on the Norse Woodsmith site to fold the brass back. I am not completely happy with the back because when I hammered it down on the back the corners opened up a little. I may see it I can find some brass rivets to secure it.

    I have all the teeth notched and just need to get motivated to finish filing the teeth in.

    Here's an old pic. I'm a couple steps further along, but not much!

  6. #6
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    Alan,

    I did something kinda like what you're talking about a couple of months ago. I had an old tenon saw with a handle that just didn't feel good in my hand. I decided to take a piece of walnut and see if I could make one that was better. I've attached a picture of the old handle and the complete saw with the new handle. Fun project until I got to the attachment point. Interesting trying to get the holes in the handle to match up with the saw blade.

    Lee Laird
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails old handle2.jpg   new handle2.jpg  

  7. #7
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:51 AM.

  8. #8
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    Alan,

    Thanks for nice words and sorry for the less then optimum pictures. Still trying to figure out what will work on the forum. The blade and old (Guess "old" is a relative term) handle were made by Sandvik. Saw is probably less than 20 years old. Hard to believe they make handles that don't fit the hand and seem to put the wrist at a poor angle.

    Lee Laird

  9. #9
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 09:43 AM.

  10. #10
    I'm starting to get the handsaw plague myself. Obviously not to the tune some of you are, but finding that 1909 Simonds saw in my shops attic was a neat find. I could not help but notice it had an Apple handle. That did not surprise me as most handles "back in the day" were made of fruitwood. I sawed out some apple wood on the sawmill a few years ago, and actually sent a piece to a guy that was rebuilding a handsaw over on the Wood Forum. I never did here how it came out however.

    Still your last post describes me Alan. My Uncle filed saws for awhile as a side business so that means I got the files, tools, and stuff to file my own saws, but was too afraid I would screw something up. In looking at the teeth though, they don't look any harder to do then filing a chainsaw, and I have got that down to a science.

    My most interesting saw I think has got to be an old "misery whip" or two man crosscut saw used for felling large trees. The saw is certainly old as can be seen by the pitted steel and riveted handle holes. The wooden handles have long been rotted. But what is interesting is the teeth. The rakers are all snapped off. At first I thought maybe it hit a nail or something, but every raker has been snapped off, even the ones on the far end of the blade. Who ever did it, did so on purpose. I am sure it was to make it cut faster, but you would think the sawdust would collect in the cut without the rakers to "rake" it out? Of course this is the Pine Tree State and back in those days they only cut hardwood for firewood. White Pine, Hemlock and Spruce were about the only woods harvested. Maybe that is why the rakers were removed?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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