Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: New standard sizes wood?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pa
    Posts
    186

    New standard sizes wood?

    I recently bought a couple of pine 2x6" from Home Depot for door
    headers that I had already started with Lowes 2"x6" 's.
    The HD 2"x6" did not match the Lowes ones? The Lowes 2"x6' was
    1-1/2 x 5-1/2" which too me is a standard 2"x6" ...while the HD's 2"x6"
    measured less than 1-7/16" x 5-3/8" width ?

    Think I just got a bad batch or is HD selling wood at new standards now?

    Another little annoying thing is the HD in my area sells 1"x2" or 1"x3" with rounded edges?
    Lowes has square edges. I didnt notice the 1"x2" and 3"
    had rounded edges until I got them home. -duh I should have noticed!-

    To me .. If I wanted rounded edges I would put the round on myself.

    Anyone else notice this?
    Donít have the best tools, don't use the best woods and projects donít always turnout perfeck.
    I just feel the need to work with wood!

  2. #2
    Sounds like you got some bum lumber there in a way. I mean that is a little small, but you have to remember too this wood is designed for framing and home construction so an 1/8 or a 1/16 really does not matter much in that application.

    If you have ever been in a sawmill you will quickly understand how these sizes get jogged around some. There is a sawmill near me that produces 675,000 board feet of lumber a day. I was awe-struct when I saw a log about 3 feet in diameter get passed through the headmill. This was 30 bandsaw blades set 1 inch apart. There was a loud whine, a crunch, and then 3 seconds later 30 boards scattering on the bed chain with another log coming right in behind it. These modern mills convert logs to lumber in seconds now...

    As for strapping, that is another whole story. Strapping is merely converted waste into a usable product. Its crap wood to start off with and crap wood after its made. Now keep in mind 1 x 3 strapping is DIFFERENT from 1x3 boards. The latter is graded according to NEMA and other wood governing associations. Strapping is not graded in any way.

    Now I can buy strapping from Ellsworth Building Supply and their strapping consists 1 x 3 boards, with sharp edges made out of White Pine. That is just what they have for strapping. Now if I go to Buxton Services, I can get strapping that is 1x 3 boards, but has rounded edges and is made out of Red, White or Black Spruce.

    Personally I prefer the rounded edges when using the stuff, but that is just me. Still I am concerned about a trend starting where framing lumber gets "nominally sized" even more. What's next our boards being 5/8 of an inch thick instead of 3/4?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  3. #3
    Of course there is nothing wrong with using strapping for a project either though...

    Quite a few years ago now I conjured up this project, making the entire train-shaped toolbox out of strapping and a little plywood. As you can see in the picture I layered layer upon layer of strapping, off-setting the widths to get the shape that I wanted. The thing was bullet-proof when I was done and took a wazoo of screws and lumber to make. I think around 750linear feet of strapping if I remember right. I think the darn thing would float though if put into a take...and that is if it was full of tools even!!

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,827
    Travis, you have stolen Dave's thread. But, so what? You answered him OK.
    That train is a hoot. Toot?
    BTW, the term you use "strapping" for lumber is new to me. Can you elucidate?
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
    Sorry, I was not meant too....

    Strapping is generally regarded as a new England term though other regions may use it as well. Its just cheap wood used in construction. Its used a lot to "strap ceilings". That is where you nail it up on 16" or 2 foot centers and nail it across roof trusses or the stringers on the overhead floor. By shimming the strapping with wedges of wood you can get a perfectly flat ceiling for the drywall the screw to.

    Being thrifty as us new Englanders are, we also use it for any number of things, from helping to hold framed up walls in plumb and level, to just odds and ends around the construction site. Often times you will see the stuff being used to hold the string lines around the four corners of a proposed home. I have several pieces nailed across my roof trusses to hold them 2 feet apart. Its just cheap, narrow boards (1 x 3) that are good for a number of things.

    They normally sell them in 10 pack bundles and can be from 8 feet to 16 feet long. Bark, wanny edges, knots and the like are all through this type of wood. Its for construction use only.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,436
    strapping...also called furring strips around these parts.

    As to the original topic.
    Any 2x6's that I have used are always 1 1/2 x 5 1/2, I have noticed treated 2x6 are just a bit larger than those measurements. Generally for rough framing the little variation that you have noticed between the two borgs are accepted.....but not by me. I always buy from my local mom and pop lumber dealer and the sizes of material are consistant.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  7. #7
    I worked part-time and on and off for my Uncle, a contractor like yourself Steve. We never paid much attention to variations in lumber sizes. Granted he always bought his lumber from a mom and pop operation too. About the first thing we did when putting up a wall was ask..

    "Flush to the outside?"

    On some buildings we would keep the studs flush with the plates on the outside, and some we kept flush to the inside, depending upon the siding and interior trim and whatnot. Most times it was to the outside.

    As for BORG lumber, most contractors here in Maine don't use them. Not just HD but any big box stores like that. The ads on TV give you the impression thatcontractors go there, but that isn't so here in Maine.

    Where I work a Lowes just opened up next to the machine shop. This is a relatively small town and already has 5 good sized, but Mom and Pop lumber dealers, and a HD to boot. With another lumber place, its just going to divide the same number of customers even more. As is, you can walk into HD on any day in that city and you can find ample parking, an empty store and no waiting in line. I can already see that something will have to close, and I can almost guarantee that it won't be any of the Mom and Pop places. That is not a slam against either big box store, just not enough customer base for the number of stores in the area.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,436
    Flush to the outside......good one.

    I've often been accused of being a finish carpenter when it comes to rough framing. I guess when you are the guy (like me) that does everything from the first nail to the last in a house you tend to look ahead for potential problems, like trim, cabinets, doors etc and want it perfect. Sadly, that is my problem, I strive for perfection and starting off by eliminating materials that are inconsistant in size helps...it often makes the guys who are sorting and delivering materials to me take a little extra time and not send me junk.....cause they end up coming back out and picking it back up when I refuse it.

    Can't say I havent used materials that are a little off when I have too, but at least I know how to fix the flaw later on.

    My dad said to me years ago...."A good carpenter knows how to hide the flaws"....flush to the outside is a good example.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  9. #9
    I enjoyed working with my Uncle. At the time I would fill in as he needed me as I was working the weekend shift. (3 12 hour days Friday through Sunday leaving a typical work week open for anything). I learned a lot from him even though we never seemed to work on anything super glamorous or anything...just homes and stuff. But when he said "let me show you a trick..." you listened.

    He's retired now, so that gig is over, plus I work real work weeks (4 10 hr days Monday-Thursday). I still enjoy building though. Maybe someday I will get sick of metal work and move to wood?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ash View Post
    I strive for perfection and starting off by eliminating materials that are inconsistant in size helps...it often makes the guys who are sorting and delivering materials to me take a little extra time and not send me junk.....cause they end up coming back out and picking it back up when I refuse it.
    I can understand that, but my local dealer and I have the opposite relationship. I absolutely hate pile-pickers as I call them and just take whats on top. I can deal with just about any lumber issue so its just roll with what they give me and move on. Bow, twist, knots...I can deal with all that easily so I don't fret over that stuff. Sometimes I will deliberately ask for the picked over garbage if I know what I am building is going to require short lengths or building something that does not really need perfect lumber. This helps him clean up his lumber yard and really helps him out. Sometimes though I need perfect lumber and when I do ask for it, I get it with no questions asked.

    All and all I got a great relationship with my lumber supplier. Of all the deliveries I have had for this new addition, never once did I have to wait for anything. They arrive within a few hours after I place my order. One thing I learned early on in life is that if you make life easy for the next guy...no matter who it is...you will be repaid at some point. I think that is why I never have to wait. I am understanding on most things,and he is too.

    Works for me...
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

Similar Threads

  1. Standard Issue?
    By Wes Bischel in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-17-2009, 08:39 AM
  2. power cord sizes
    By Brad Hungler in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-28-2007, 05:05 PM
  3. SU-changing sizes
    By Jeff Horton in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-15-2007, 11:18 AM
  4. hole sizes
    By Frank Fusco in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-30-2006, 12:38 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •