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Thread: 110 or 240 volt?

  1. #1
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    110 or 240 volt?

    Just curious, My TS will run either 110 or 240. I have wiring for both ran to my garage. Would one be better over the other?

    I just have a delta contractor saw with a 1 1/2 hp motor, so other than perhaps reducing the high amp startup draw, I'm not sure it would matter.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  2. #2
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    Oh the long controversial subject of 120 vs. 240 ...

    The short answer to your question: TRY it and find out.

    Some it helps. Others it makes no difference. All other responses are gonna boil down to controversy. Best to just try it and see - since you have the ability. It'd only cost ya a plug if you already have an outlet in place
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
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    Now that's the best advice I've seen given on this subject, Jason...

    Very true words indeed.

    Give it a shot, Darren...I did.

  4. #4
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 09:27 AM.

  5. #5
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    I just recently switched my 1 1/2hp Ridgid contractor's saw from 110v to 220v, and the only difference I can "feel" is that it seems to get up to full speed more quickly. (This could all be in my head, though.)

    As Alan mentioned, in my case, it seemed to make sense due to the "cushion" from not having to run at the upper limits of the circuit's amperage rating. I feel better using 6.5 amps of a 20 amp 220v circuit than 13 amps of a 15 amp 110v circuit.

    I also switched my 1 1/2hp bandsaw to 220v, but haven't really used it enough since to see if it made any perceptible difference. I did opt to keep my new 1hp drill press at 110v, since that gives me more options for plugging it in as I move it around the shop.

    Jason had the best advice...give it a try and see if it makes any difference for you. It's doubtful it'll be worse on 220v than 110v.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  6. #6
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    I'd also say give it a go

    Now if you have a bunch of stuff already on your 110v lines, taking the TS off of those circuits might also be a good idea. Do you have a DC? If so, is it on the 110v or the 220v line?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    I figured this had been debated before, but didn't find anything on it when I searched. Personally I was thinking it would be less startup amps and better on the motor, so I'll give it a go and see how they do.

    Thanks all,

    P.S. Stu, no DC...
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
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    I switched my TS to 220v about 5 years ago. It made a little difference at startup with my GI 50-185, but it made more of a difference on my Craftsman 22124. The improvement, if any, will really depend on the motor and the existing circuit.

    If your TS performance is terrific as is, and you don't have an existing 220v line, I probably wouldn't put one in just to try it. But if you've got the 220 line available, or if the saw bogs and dims other lights often, I'd definitely give it a go.....let us know.

    (don't forget to turn off the power!)
    Got Wood?

  9. #9
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    All things being correct, there would be no difference in performance. Some folks prefer or feel better about one or the other. In my case I was running 110v via poor existing wiring. Rewired the shop but left the TS at 110v on proper wire (although capable of 220v operation) and a dedicated circuit; great improvement.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  10. #10
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    Probably the only place you will see a civil debate on this.

    Fact: If you motor draws 10 amps on 110V, it will draw 5 amps on 220V. That is just Ohms law. So if you have limited amperage to your shop/undersized wiring that can be a plus. If you had a problem with the amp draw you could see an improvement in the saws performance. BUT ONLY because you had a problem. Not because you Hot-Rodded your motor.

    My understanding, and I probably will not explain this 100% accurate, is even when you rewire to 220 volts the voltage is split and the windings in the motor are still running on 110v. Nothing internally changes. So the motor doesn't have more power. A 1hp motor is still a 1 hp motor. Again, assuming you didn't have a amp draw problem.

    I hear and read people say what Alan did, that it is less stressful, motors run cooler etc. I have never seen anything that proves that to me. It may or may not be true. I won't take sides on that. I should have been from Missouri I guess, but I would like to see proof on way or the other. So pick your side on that one.

    Yes it is true, some saws seem to jump to life after converting. Thats because of the decrease in amp draw. My old table saw, there was a huge difference in start up time. Matter of fact it scared me the first time it came up to speed so fast. I literally jumped back thinking something was wrong.

    I run almost everything that I can on 220 just because. It doesn't make any difference and if I didn't have 220V all around the shop I would just use 110V.
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