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Thread: Starting big

  1. #1

    Starting big

    ]Hey you guys, First of all I want to thank Jeff Bower for inviting to this forum. It looks like is a big one. I am a metal sculptor but I am trying to add some natural power to my pieces and wood is one of my main options. So even when I am going to take my first class on wood turning tomorrow, I am already planning to build my own lathe. I already read other threads about it and I am prety sure that I am going to go with a bowl lathe like this. So I found on the internet the Delta Rockwell Headstock on the pictures and I would like to see what do you guys think about it. Thank you so much

    Alfredo Alamo
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Delta rockwell headstock.jpg   dr5.jpg   DR3.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    13,468
    Alfredo,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Looks like it should be a fun project, might consider making the rest where it will allow more adjustment, but it looks sturdy enough.

    Post some pics when you get it done. Would like to see some of your metal work as well.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    oswego county , upstate n.y.
    Posts
    280
    welcome alfredo

    nothing like starting off with a big project now thats what i call jumping in head first keep us posted with progress pics along the way ....
    what are you building today ??

    GRIZZLY

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,809
    Welcome to the Family Alfredo!

    I saw that homemade lathe a while back, it is a great design and I'm sure it works well too!

    One thing that I would add, that might be overkill, is I'd fill the webs of the "I" beams with concrete, as I've found that there is a surprising amount of flex in those "I" beams, I understand they are supposed to be somewhat flexible

    You would leave space for the banjo clamp block under the top, in the center. I'd also not finish the tops, leave them, or grind/sand them to bear metal.

    OK, a third thing I'd add would be a linked belt, this will really cut down on any vibration from the motor.

    Nice to have another guy who knows his way around working steel, can't wait to pick your brain!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Hey guy thank you for welcoming me and for your answers.

    Stuart, I already thought about the concrete part even when the length of the "I" beams is to short to flex but I am going to do it anyways. The idea of leaving the top of the bed clean is fantastic, I can see what you mean. Now, the rest of your answer is in chinese what does banjo clamp block under the top, in the center mean Also, I was googling "linked belt" and all I came up with was "fashion belts" Remember that I know next to nothing about turning and lathes...BTW do you think that that headstok would be a good thing to have?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,809
    Quote Originally Posted by Alfredo Alamo View Post
    Hey guy thank you for welcoming me and for your answers.

    Stuart, I already thought about the concrete part even when the length of the "I" beams is to short to flex but I am going to do it anyways. The idea of leaving the top of the bed clean is fantastic, I can see what you mean. Now, the rest of your answer is in chinese what does banjo clamp block under the top, in the center mean Also, I was googling "linked belt" and all I came up with was "fashion belts" Remember that I know next to nothing about turning and lathes...BTW do you think that that headstok would be a good thing to have?
    If you put concrete in the webs, make darn sure you have a good spot picked out for that beast, as you will NOT be wanting to have to move it

    The "Banjo" is the part of the lathe that slides on the bed (the thing on your lathe that is made up from the "I" beams) this holds the tool rest.

    The clamp block is the part that goes below the webs, when you tighten the banjo, the clamp block is below the bed and is drawn upwards against the I-beam web, to clamp the banjo in place.

    here is a pic............

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Of the underside of the banjo, you can see the round clamp block. When you fill the space between the two I-beams, you would need to leave space on the underside of the bed for this to slide back and forth.

    About the headstock, the only thing I'd be at all concerned about is that it is straight and the pulleys are not bent at all, bearings can be replaced, also, what is the thread size on the spindle? This type of lathe was designed for spindle turning between centers, so the headstock spindle may not be that rugged..........

    I guess it would depend on how cheap it was too.

    The linked belts are like this..........
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I think they are actually called "Power Twist Linked Belts"

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Cotswolds, UK
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    629
    If I might butt in here, when talking about stiffening up machine mountings do you ever considerer which part of the lathe is subjected to the greatest destructive shock loads if the whole assembly cannot 'give' a little.

    I would have though it results in the spindle bearings microscopic grease or oil film taking a lot more punishment than necessary.
    Chas. just a traveller on the road of time.

    Bits & Pieces Gallery
    My Web Site

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    Chas, I'd say the wood would give a lot too

    You are correct in that too much stiffness can be a bad thing, I think back to the GP bikes of the 80's, their quest for chassis stiffness led them down the road to frames so stiff, the bikes were un-ride-able, and they had to engineer some flex into the systems.

    I'd build it, and then if needed, you could just add the concrete.

    I'd still be looking for a bit beefier headstock.

    Where are you at Alfredo?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
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    5,719
    Alfredo, glad you found us. I think you'll get lots of good ideas for you lathe here.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    618
    Welcome, Alfredo. Enjoy yourself here; you'll find there are a lot of people here who can give you great information. Of course, I'm not one of them; still a lot for me to learn, too.

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