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Thread: Need suggestions for painting table

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Independence Ky
    Posts
    117

    Need suggestions for painting table

    These legs were my first turning project. I am pleased with the turnout. I did not have an outside micrometer so I eyeballed them.

    I searched past post and was not able to find a way to seal/stain or seal/paint this table. the wood is poplar and from what I did find was that poplar does not stain very well.The table top is pine. This is O.K because the LOML wants it painted white to match her wicker furn.
    My question is should I apply a sealer to help with any shrinking and cracking. Will the paint be sufficient? I bought a new Wagner 2400psi sprayer to apply paint. I am not sure which is the recommended paint for indoor furn.
    I sure would appreciate any suggestions. Thanks everyone.





  2. #2
    Pretty darn good for "Eyeballin' dimensions" But who on earth told you that poplar doesn't stain well. It is one of the most neutral woods going, With good prep and color choices you can match just about any Hardwood and with some creativity, clone some nice woods. It is an industry standard for secondary woods because it stains to match so well.

    But it also paints well, a good primer, Allow to dry and harden, scuff sand or rub down with scotchbrite pad, then add the color top coat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Independence Ky
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    117
    Hello Bill,
    Good to hear from you.
    I have a Jim Tolpin's book of carpentry from the library that said poplar is not a good staining wood. I prefer a natural look of wood as apposed to paint. I am going to reconsider the finish now that you say poplar can be stained.
    I like using tung oil and poly over that.
    Thanks again for getting me started turning.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    I'm working a painted project right now and this stuff works well. If it had not been a re-painting job I would have just used shellac as Jeff Jewitt mentions here.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Pretty darn good for "Eyeballin' dimensions" But who on earth told you that poplar doesn't stain well. It is one of the most neutral woods going, With good prep and color choices you can match just about any Hardwood and with some creativity, clone some nice woods. It is an industry standard for secondary woods because it stains to match so well.

    But it also paints well, a good primer, allow to dry and harden, scuff sand or rub down with scotchbrite pad, then add the color top coat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Hungler View Post
    Hello Bill,
    Good to hear from you.
    I have a Jim Tolpin's book of carpentry from the library that said poplar is not a good staining wood. I prefer a natural look of wood as apposed to paint. I am going to reconsider the finish now that you say poplar can be stained.
    I like using tung oil and poly over that.
    Thanks again for getting me started turning.
    Hi Brad ,
    I agree with Bill on the versatility of poplar. I use it alot, but maybe it is the stain I use. No disrespect to Jim but I do use it on many projects, painted and stained at that. I would vote for Bill on poplar advice of the week, but you must really decide for yourself, with experience. Here is a birch plywood bench/automan/shoerack trimmed out in poplar.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Try it, you'll like it.
    Shaz
    Oh, by the way...Nice Job on that table!!!!!
    I am a registered voter and you can be too. We ( registered voters ) select the moderators for this forum by voting every six months for the people we want to watch over this family forum.
    Please join me. Register now.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Independence Ky
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    117
    Thanks Glenn,
    Thanks Shaz,
    Looks like stain is the way I'm going. It is going in the family room that I have yet to start. Need to take out a wall, add a beam, then light colored wood up to chair rail. Still in the planning stages.
    Will post pics of finish product. Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Problem with staining wood come from prep... Poor prep provides poor stain performance. Poplar is such a neutral grain but prep processing can create problems as discribed in his article. raising the grain is the secret. On lathe projects as well as flat work I always raise the grain. That is wetting with clean clear water (bottled or filtered water) allowing to dry and see that the grain fibers smashed down during milling process or sanding creates a fuzzy surface. sand off the fuzz and the result is a smoothe even surface that will accept the stain. During the milling process the wood fibers a crushed and pushed down they are sealed in a way, Open the grain by wetting and allowing to dry raises those crushed cells and allows the stain to penetrate and make a suitable finish. Prep is the secret.

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