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Thread: 1940s Boice Crane scroll saw

  1. #1
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    1940s Boice Crane scroll saw

    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 09:30 AM.

  2. #2
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    OK, nice get. It's one of the two saws i'd actually replace mine with (an old Walker Turner J-24) if it fell in my lap (the other would be the direct drive version of the Walker Turner).
    have fun with it. That thing should outlast just about anything else in your shop.
    Paul Hubbman

  3. #3
    Nice find...

    In regards to the files...we have a 1945 Do-All Bandsaw that we recently renovated, mostly because the thing sees a lot of work and this is in a stainless only machine shop. Anyway I was shocked to find out the company is still in business and still builds these bandsaws, but what was even more amazing wassome "file blades" you could get for it.

    I am not making this up. They had these blades that have short sections of files riveted to the bandsaw blade. They are only 2-3 inches long so that the files can travel around the bandsaw wheels, but its like having a never ending file.

    It was the craziest thing I have ever seen. That being said, I think I would rather use your scrollsaw and a file rather than a bandsaw with a file blade attached. Still you got to admit such a creation is pretty crazy.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    What he would do is start with a 9" blade, and the cutting is only about 1" - 1 1/2" deep, so he would just snap a piece off the blade, and then reinsert the 8", do more work, snap off another inch, and insert the 7", this way you get a lot more life out of one blade.
    Alan...that is a great feature, but even with regular scrollsaws you can do a similar trick...or at least I do because I am cheap. Most of the time I only cut with the first inch or two of the blade. When it gets dull I have a 1 inch thick sheet of plywood that fits on top of my scrollsaw table. That picks my wood up 1 inch and into a fresh set of teeth.When that gets dull,I shove in a table made of two (1 inch thick plywood) so that I am now into some more fresh teeth. I suppose you could keep going but I figure 3 times the life on a scrollsaw blade is enough so I stop there.

    I am not trying to detract from your newly purchased machine, I just thought I would let others on here know they can kind of do the same thing on standard and new scrollsaw, but rather then shorten the blade, they can just raise the level of their tables up!
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
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    Alan, you must be living right! Great looking saw and it sounds immensely versatile!

  6. #6
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:54 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    Travis,Do-All is a great company for band saws. Do you have one with the blade welder on it? I had been wanting a metal cutting band saw, but with this I might not need that now and just be content with my wood cutting bandsaw, and this scroll saw.
    Yes it does. It's often needed too because to cut rings, a common backing plate for stainless port holes and stuff, you need to be able to thread the blade up through the inside hole, then reweld the blade back together.

    Of course we can use the CNC mill to cut these rings out to, but positioning hold downs,the computer programing, and time to do all that is prohibitive. So is tying up the CNC mill for a one-off project. I demonstrated once that the bandsaw could do just as good of a job, and faster then going through the CNC cut out programing and set-up stuff.

    Over on Wood Online I suggested once that you can do the same thing with your woodworking bandsaw to cut rings and inside cuts if you did not have a scrollsaw. Man was I ever beaten for that comment...like silver soldering bandsaw blades together is hard. I got a kit that does my home saw, but the one on the machine is definately easier.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:54 AM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    Time is everything, I agree.

    If you did run those pieces all the time, it would make sense to have a machine setup, but it sounds like you don't need to do them very often. I've seen people setup a machine, make a run to have stock, and then they wouldn't have to do it again for a while.

    I know a lot of folks do cut metal on their wood cutting bandsaws, I've not done it myself though. I don't have any blades for it is the main reason.
    Whoops...sorry for the confusion. No I was not saying cutting metal with a wood machine,the people on Wood Online thought I was nuts for cutting a bandsaw blade in half on purpose,and then working it back up through a drilled hole to complete the inner cut of the ring or whatever and then rewelding it back together.

    Its actually quite easy to do, but then again I have a deep welding back ground too. I would never give this trick another thought really.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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