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Thread: Good technique for cutting wedges

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    161

    Good technique for cutting wedges

    Howdy, All!! Last night, I modified the joinery design of a project I'm working on for my kids. I need to cut a number of small wedges for a wedged-tenon joint, and am looking for some guidance on an efficient, safe way to do this. The wedges dimensions will be roughly 1.5"L x .75"W, and about 3/16 thick at the top. Like I said....small.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    Regards,

    Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    765
    Keith, when I need to make parts that small I always turn to a sled for my table saw. You can build a block and fence system that will work like a tapering jig to hold the pieces. Safest way I know.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX
    Posts
    320
    Sled is a good idea. Add some sort of method for clamping the stock to the sled for the table saw use. I'd be happier doing it on the bandsaw, myself and cleaning up the cuts on the beltsander.
    Jerry

    http://www.sawdustersplace.com

    "If politics wasn't built on careful deception it wouldn't need its own word and techniques. It would just be called honesty, education, and leadership."
    Bob "Phydeaux" Stewart one day on Woodnet

  4. #4
    Keith I am forced to make small parts all the time for my custom wooden models. When it comes to cutting small parts I head to two machines, my bandsaw or my scrollsaw. That is because high powered blade spinning machines have enough airflow from the spinning blade to blow them almost anywhere.

    The bandsaw or scrollsaw does not have kickback, and allows you to really hold the part without fear of cutting off your fingers. I always make my parts long, then cut off the small from that just to be safe.

    If you don't mind doing stuff by hand, cutting them with a dovetail saw or miterbox gives you the ultimate control and safety.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    161
    Thanks, guys!!

    Travis, the scrollsaw is a great idea. I hadn't thought of doing it that way!

    I appreciate the help, Gents!

    - Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  6. #6
    Bob Wiggins is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    140 miles west of tulsa
    Posts
    125
    I'd be inclined to use my trusty old tablesaw. With an 8 or maybe 10 inch width of lumber cut the taper similar to this cutting board end. Then rip into strips the desired width followed by cutting each to length.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cutting board corner 3-9-07.jpg  
    Last edited by Bob Wiggins; 02-21-2008 at 12:02 AM.

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