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Thread: Gun Stock Wood

  1. #1
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    Gun Stock Wood

    My deer hunting buddy just dropped by, he got a hold of two chunks of wood a friend brought back from Germany. He says that he was told the wood is "Rosewood", I do not know, but to me, it looks more like Walnut.

    There are two pieces, both are 11 cm x 6 cm ( 4 1/4" x 2 3/16"), and their lengths differ, one is 60 cm long (23 5/16") and the other is 66 cm long (26").

    Each blank is stamped with a number on the end, as well as the ends being sealed up with what feels like wax, the wood is bone dry, ready to work.

    They were seconds sold off by the German gun maker "Merkel Jagd & Sporrtwaffen GmbH" or just Merkel, I guess.

    I don't have my camera here (my cell phone is sitting on the charger at home) so I cannot take a pic to show you the wood, but, to my eye, is sure looks like Walnut.

    Anyway, nice wood, has a few minor inclusions in it, but I should be able to make something from it.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Pepper mills, tool handles, pens (of course), bottle stoppers, candle stands...the list is almost endless.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  3. #3
    Its hard to tell what wood is, especially if its a picture or short section like yours. I hope this doesn't come to blows Stu, but I suspect that it is indeed Rosewood. Walnut and Rosewood can look a lot alike, especially if its aged,and I am sure it is.

    For me what gives it away is the stamp on the end of it. This is a common practice down in Central American where Rosewood grows.The tribes down there get a stipend for the wood I believe and the stamp tells you where and when it came from. I could be wrong of course, but I am betting that its Rosewood.

    Got some sandpaper? You could sand a little off the end grain and the sweet smell should tell you right way if its Rosewood or Walnut. That was how Rosewood got its name...a very sweet smelling wood that lasts quite awhile after its cut.

    Either way, its always nice to get wood...exotic or otherwise.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  4. #4
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    Sounds like a nice score Stu. Would like to see some pics of it. I have some rosewood in my shop and use it occasionally. One problem I have though is I am alergic to it and have to wear a mask when working with it.

  5. #5
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    OK, here are some pics...........

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The two pieces side by side, the one on the left I just planed a bit. On the right, there is a thin piece of Walnut I had sitting on top.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A close up of the "Gun Stock Wood".

    Not sure, if it is Walnut, it has some funky grain.

    Travis, no sweet smell at all

    I just found this pic on the net.........

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It is called "Indian Rosewood"

    Could be I guess.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Doesn't smell like walnut from here.
    There are jillions of 'rosewoods'. Hard to say fer certain, fer sure ifn' it is or it ain't. Is it reall heavy? I would think most of the rosewoods would make lousy stocks because of the weight.

  7. #7
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    Yep, it is really heavy, not as heavy as that Desert Ironwood, but similar.

    I looked it up, and apparently it is used for large bore "Safari" rifles, because it can really take a hit
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    Yep, it is really heavy, not as heavy as that Desert Ironwood, but similar.

    I looked it up, and apparently it is used for large bore "Safari" rifles, because it can really take a hit
    Try the 'float/no float' test. Some (not me) say 'no float' means rosewood. Sure wish Jim King was active here, he could help with things like this.

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