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Thread: My Inside Hunting Dog

  1. #1

    My Inside Hunting Dog

    I am actively engaged in an experiment; for the last few days I have been having some "big mice" gnawing overhead in my attic. Its no big secret that out here in the country, "big mice" have a tendency to try to make your nice warm home a free place hang out in.The scratching and chewing has pretty much been driving the wife and I crazy, so we did some research online and then released our secret weapon...Issac.

    I got Kenworth who is a retired Rabbit dog (Basset Hound) and Bailey who is a Black Lab that is scared of water. Then there is Issac. He is a Miniature Schnauzer who pretty much is a lap dog. Still his breed was bred to hunt rats on ships because of their small size and gentle demeanor when not on the hunt.

    Anyway we called the Vet and he said not only is it okay for Issac to go on the hunt, it would be good for him, its what he was meant to do and release some of his energy. So as I type this is is running around in my attic on the hunt for these rodents. From the sounds of it (rumbling and walking overhead) he's doing pretty good.

    Last edited by Travis Johnson; 02-21-2008 at 07:22 PM.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Springfield OH
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    806
    You need my labs, certified critter killers. mice, rats, possums, coons, groundhogs, you name it. I'll bet Issac is having a ball.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    6,098
    Our Rat Terriers or our Mini Jack Russells would have a blast up there!!! I assume you have piney squirrels? So if you run into a problem of him being to large, have one Mini Jack Russell left out of the last litter!

  4. #4
    Jon...you are right, I need a smaller dog. I think the "big mice" are living underneath some planks I have for my attic storage floor, and the ceiling of the house. This is 12 inch high area, about 6 feet wide the length of the house. I did that so I could get a full 12 inches of insulation over my place.

    There is no question your pint sized Miniature Jack Russel would get the job done, but with three dogs already, the last thing I need is another dog.

    We contacted a pest control place but they want WAYYYY to much to rid this house of those rodents. I was told by an old timer to get a rabbit. He claimed he has a rabbit in his hen house as "two rodents will not share the same dwelling."

    I grew up in Maine,and country living all my life and never heard of that before. Anyone else?

    Not sure how a rabbit would be anyway, my basset Hound is a trained rabbit hunting dog, but at 10 years old, he's retired now. I don't know if old instincts would kick in or not.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    11,832
    Not sure if yer talking about tree rats or real rats. Real rats would be another kind of problem but easily remedied with D-Con. Squirrels can be a problem. And, I have no doubt yer terrier will go after them. But, another concern I would have. Stink. Rotting dead critters stink. Even if he eats them completely (unlikely), there would be other kinds of stinks emanating from yer attic, especially come springtime.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Between Aledo and Fort Worth, TX
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    2,784
    My first thought is the D-Con type poison also. But with dogs, or cats, if they get to the dead animal before you do, they just ate the same poison.
    My parents have had a couple Min. Schnauzers. With the first one, Dad would shoot a squirrel out of the pecan tree, and Mitzi would grab the thing, kill it, then eat it. Everything but the tail! Rattler got her in the face when she was about 12 years old. The new one doesn't eat squirrels. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
    Exclusively Irish!
    Home of Irish Setter Rescue of North Texas
    When Irish Eyes are smiling, they're usually up to something!!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...but most likely, I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, season 3


  7. #7
    Yeah they are rats, or as my wife prefers to call them...despite knowing the difference...big mice.

    I've gone through the D-con routine before, but it only thins out the herd. I suppose my dog could only do likewise.

    As for my dog, he doesn't eat his kills. He is so funny, he is always so calm and lovable...until he sees a mouse or snake. Then his ears sweep back, he starts snarling, then jumps after the mice or snake. Grabbing them behind the neck, he shakes them apart. That's all he does...shakes them to death. Then his ears go back to upright, he walks over to us and wags his tail like it never happened.

    This works great for me since I HATE snakes. We have no poisonous snakes here in Maine (the timber rattle snake was eradicated and has not been seen since in 1910), but every snake to me is deadly (heart attack wise). So now when I tread in snake country, I either:

    A: Go there only between November and May
    B: Put Issac on a leash and let him patrol the area beforehand to either kill the snakes or at least chase them away
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Suburban DC (formerly western PA)
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    176
    Hi Travis,

    I'm pretty much of a lurker here, reading up on what I can relating to wood carving... however, being a dog lover and rescuer, I wanted to add how important it is for dogs like Issac to "have a job." :-) Otherwise, like people, they get bored, destructive and the next thing you know, they're out the door--- and I'm rescuing them. :-) With three Beagles of my own and having previously owned a mini Aussie, I know of what I speak.

    May I add having cats in residence helps immensely. "Big mice" and even "small mice" despise the smell of cats and will avoid your area.

    Good luck!

    --MJ, amateur woodworker and professional marketer :-)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    kennewick wa
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    31
    What about a live trap? Then take them outside for the dog to kill. We some times get one in a booster station, thats how we get them. But you have to be some what tricky with baiting it, got to make sure the bait is all the way back and even tie it to the cage. They have got the bait more then once and never trip the latch. I don't know how they do it, it takes very little pressure to trip it. A ear of corn worked pretty good.
    Stacey

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by MJ Isles View Post
    Hi Travis,

    I'm pretty much of a lurker here, reading up on what I can relating to wood carving... however, being a dog lover and rescuer, I wanted to add how important it is for dogs like Issac to "have a job." :-) Otherwise, like people, they get bored, destructive and the next thing you know, they're out the door--- and I'm rescuing them. :-) With three Beagles of my own and having previously owned a mini Aussie, I know of what I speak.

    May I add having cats in residence helps immensely. "Big mice" and even "small mice" despise the smell of cats and will avoid your area.

    Good luck!

    --MJ, amateur woodworker and professional marketer :-)
    I've had a few Beagles myself...again Rabbit Dogs. One was really well trained and ran rabbits really well, but he had one trait that made him useless for hunting. He refused to bark!

    That did not bother me too much. He was a great dog and lived a long life. One day in his older years I opened up the door and he stuck his head out. He looked left, looked right, then slowly stuck his head back in the door. He was done and we both knew it. I put him down a few days later.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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