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Thread: Step Nosing Detail

  1. #1

    Step Nosing Detail

    Hey All,

    Im about to start redoing the treads and risers on 2 staircases in my home. I've pulled up the carpet + nailer strips, and plan to keep the existing risers and replace the treads using salvaged boards from elsewhere in the house (all original 1861 pine) but need to decide on the nosing detail first.

    The effect we want is that of a thick, chunky tread (as if the whole tread is a 2" thick board). Please refer to attached sketch...Also photos of mockups for details 1) and 2) attached.....3) and 4) not mockedup!

    1) works well but my wife doesn't like seeing the seam - disrupts the effect of a single thick 2" tread when sanded + finished in place will the seam be as noticable?
    2) we both like this very simple + clean detail too (no nosing overhang) but we lose 3/4" in the tread dimension making a dangerously short tread (8.5" T with 7.5" R as opposed to 9.25" T)
    3) a mitering idea that might hide the seam - but will this be weak and break apart? What about a stain taking to / wearing away from a joint like this?
    4) the detail im leaning towards...seam visible on top but i think that's the lesser of two evils compared to 1) above. will the 2 pieces wear at different rates?

    Any and all thoughts are welcome! I'm sure there's something I'm not thinking of so I'm curious to hear what people think.

    Thanks - Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails nosing details.jpg   mockup1.jpg   mockup2.jpg  
    Last edited by Robert Gilmore; 02-28-2008 at 06:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    why redo some thing to make it elegal redo it to make it right

  3. #3
    Sure....But what makes any of these elegal???

  4. #4
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    Hi Rob ,
    The tread as I see it needs be like the rendition you have in #1. You don't want nor do you need a seam on the top or a seam from a miter on the stair tread. It is the same principle with the built up edge in corian/marble/granite etc, overlap and add underneath.

    Since you want a thick edge maybe you would consider building up the front edge using the same grain edge as the tread rather than the face of another board then at least you have some semblance of order to the tread nosing and glue up. Does that make sense? You may have to use several strips to get the correct thickness, but a least the grain pattern has a chance of matching. Good luck and keep us posted.
    Shaz
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  5. #5
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    I agree with Robert. I think No. 1 makes the most sense. It also seems to be the easiest.

    By the way, I've never heard the term "elegal" is this something like "elegant"?
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  6. #6
    Good suggestion rotating the add-on nosing strip for edge grain uniformity on option 1....the wood is 3/4" actual so 2 pieces (the tread and the add-on nosing piece) at 1.5" total will probably be just fine from a design perspective.

    I suspect the "elegal" comment was in reference to possible code violation with this thick nosing dimensions ("ilegal?")....Anybody see anything wrong form a code perspective with a 7.5" riser / 9.25" T with a 1.5" nose that overhangs .... say 3/4" ?


    I'll bullnose the top edge of the tread nosing...should the bottom edge of the add-on strip beneath the tread be rounded as well so as to not catch shoes going up?

    thanks - rg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Gilmore View Post
    ...I'll bullnose the top edge of the tread nosing...should the bottom edge of the add-on strip beneath the tread be rounded as well so as to not catch shoes going up?

    thanks - rg
    That'd probably be a good idea. Most folks wouldn't have a problem, but you never know. It's sure be a shame to have Grandma (or anyone else) trip and fall on the stairs. A simple roundover would probably be all that's needed.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  8. #8
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    code requires that all steps max rise of 7 3/4''' run must be 10''+1 1/4 over hang. tread overhang not to exc 1.25' thinkess.ubc
    Last edited by gary robertson; 03-02-2008 at 02:10 AM.

  9. #9

    stripping the old paint

    not sure if anyone's checking in here anymore, but I figure I'll try to post questions as they come up here, and results as they come in (soon!)

    Well for my little steps project I have encountered all kinds of twists and turns (figuratively speaking, the steps themselves are pretty straight!)

    Is it recommended that I scrape / sand the ancient (probably lead) paint before cutting and nailing the salvaged pine boards in place? This is the 1861 pumpkin pine we're talking about here - salvaged from under the carpet of 1 room + 2 closets -

    I used my orbital sander on the mockup pieces posted previously and that worked pretty well on a small scale....

    What is recommended method for the boards going down on the 2 flights of steps?

    chemical stripper?
    sander only?
    heat gun?

    In place (after cut and nailed up as steps) or out on the deck pre-install?

    Attached pic shows a stretch of particularly nasty paint + wear and tear.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails salvaging_pineboards.jpg  

  10. #10
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    Rob,
    I'd bet that's lead-based paint. Much of the paint used before about 1960 or so was lead based. Chemical stripper, while wearing all the necessary breathing and contact protection, along with good ventilation of the site, would be the order of the day, as would proper disposal of the residue.

    I sure don't envy you the job ahead, either!
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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