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Thread: leaky pipe in wall

  1. #1
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    leaky pipe in wall

    My shop is in an extra long one-car garage of a walk-out basement. At the end furthest from the door is where the pipe and wires come into the house for the well pressure pump. This is also right next to my lathe. Where the pipe enters through a hole in the poured basement wall is about four feet underground on the outside. It is also under my deck. When we get heavy rains and the earth is saturated, water leaks through the pipe opening. The opening was poorly sealed when this was originally installed with only spray foam insulation. It should have been tarred from the outside before backfilling. But to correct that now would be a very expensive option. I plan to dig out as much of the useless foam as possible and (try to) plug the leak with something else. Problem is: I don't know what that "something else" should be to seal properly and last. Ideas welcome.

  2. #2
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    Frank,
    I don't know if Hydraulic Cement would work around the pipe but I've used it to seal concrete walls.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn Clabo View Post
    Frank,
    I don't know if Hydraulic Cement would work around the pipe but I've used it to seal concrete walls.

    That is under consideration. If I use it, I will make a thin mix then using something like a big syringe squirt into the openings until it won't take any more.
    Still looking for ideas.

  4. #4
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    Errr, I'm pretty sure that Hydraulic cement expands when it dries! Best be sure about that before packing it around a pipe.

  5. #5
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    Lets back up and address the water. Is there anyway to get the water to run away before it becomes a problem? Move a gutter discharge? Change the grading so that the water runs away? Add a drain box and drain line?

    If there is a way, keeping the water away from the wall is the real cure. Of course that is not always possible and I realize that. But the leak is often a symptom, not the problem.

    I had water getting in my crawl space which would eventually leak into my basement because my builder thought he knew more than me! And I backed down and shouldn't have, but that is another story. I installed a sump pump and that got the water out but didn't cure the problem, the reason water was getting in there in the first place. I rented a ditcher, installed a drain box and ran a drain around the house to the back. That solved the problem. No water in the crawl space anymore.

    I don't have any good ideas on how to seal that hole. Is hydraulic concrete not porous? Would the water still seep in? Not familiar with it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    Errr, I'm pretty sure that Hydraulic cement expands when it dries! Best be sure about that before packing it around a pipe.
    That's the idea, expand and fill the cracks. I'm sure it would expand in direction of least resistance before squeezing a pipe to death.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post
    Lets back up and address the water. Is there anyway to get the water to run away before it becomes a problem? Move a gutter discharge? Change the grading so that the water runs away? Add a drain box and drain line?

    If there is a way, keeping the water away from the wall is the real cure. Of course that is not always possible and I realize that. But the leak is often a symptom, not the problem.

    I had water getting in my crawl space which would eventually leak into my basement because my builder thought he knew more than me! And I backed down and shouldn't have, but that is another story. I installed a sump pump and that got the water out but didn't cure the problem, the reason water was getting in there in the first place. I rented a ditcher, installed a drain box and ran a drain around the house to the back. That solved the problem. No water in the crawl space anymore.

    I don't have any good ideas on how to seal that hole. Is hydraulic concrete not porous? Would the water still seep in? Not familiar with it.

    No way to change flow of water. The ground slopes from front to rear with the rear being the 'walk-out' side of the house. The water problem isn't serious flooding but I do get a puddle.
    I'll check further, but I believe hydraulic cement is water impervious once cured.
    Tearing up my deck and hiring a backhoe is what I am trying to avoid.

  8. #8
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    I've asked around and many have said they have used Hydraulic Cement ( I think it's called water stop) for this. It seems that it really doesn't expand so much...but it doesn't shrink as much as regular cement. However I'd call Quikrete help line ...
    1-800-282-5828 to find out exactly what they recommend.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn Clabo View Post
    I've asked around and many have said they have used Hydraulic Cement ( I think it's called water stop) for this. It seems that it really doesn't expand so much...but it doesn't shrink as much as regular cement. However I'd call Quikrete help line ...
    1-800-282-5828 to find out exactly what they recommend.
    Thanks. I just came back from Lowe's and looked over everything they had that could be squoshed or squeezed into the cracks. Everything except Quickcrete hydraulic cement warned not to use below water line. A bucket, which is about 20X more than I need only costs $10.00. Now, I'm looking for some kind of oversized syringe to do the squirting with.

  10. #10
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    Plastic Freezer Bag with the corner cut out. Works great for brickwork.

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